How do you purge the air and replace the oil filter on a Riello Mectron M5?

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Old 03-29-15, 01:45 PM
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How do you purge the air and replace the oil filter on a Riello Mectron M5?

I am having trouble determining how to purge the air from a Riello Mectron M5 oil pump. Unlike most others, there does not seem to be a readily identifiable purge valve. I have identified (and not moved) the set screw for the pressure. There are several different arrows on the side of the housing that might help to identify where I need to purge, but I have not found any guidance on the internet.

Thanks in advance. My father never DIY, so I am trying to learn as problems crop up (like letting the oil tank run dry, which will not happen again, but that doesn't help so much right now). Owning a house does teach you a lot of things, if you let it!

Have a 90 year old mother-in-law in the house so would like to get the heat back; if Spring actually arrives I will have some time as my hot water heater is gas. But otherwise, just trying to give it a go myself before calling in the reinforcements.

Thanks again. Have to work tomorrow, so if we end up calling in someone, I will miss learning how to do it myself.
 
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Old 03-29-15, 05:20 PM
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Here are some pictures. Thought that might help.
 
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Old 03-29-15, 05:26 PM
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Here are the pictures that show the options I have to choose from.
 
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Old 03-29-15, 08:08 PM
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The hex plug below the pump pressure set screw is were the air is released from the pump , There is a metal washer on the plug that is easily lost , remove the plug and run burner until all the air is removed . The cover with the arrows has a removal screen in it that can be cleaned and replaced, caution as there is an o ring that seals the cover that if it comes out of its grove will not go back in as the oil causes it to swell so a new one will be needed . A purge valve can be obtained that will replace the hex nut which is more convenient when bleeding pump,
 
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Old 04-02-15, 04:46 PM
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Thank you, saves.

Here is an update.

I let the oil tank run dry. I arranged a delivery, and waited an hour for the tank to settle before trying to restart the boiler. I pressed the reset button, the pump ran and the electric starter clicked and fired (lighted), then stalled. I again pressed the reset button, the pump ran and the electric starter clicked and fired (lighted), then stalled. Any further attempts did not result in the oil lighting.

I removed the hex bolt completely. The washer must have been lost by someone previously as I did not come across one. I hit the reset button quite a few times and continued to do this until I had a good flow of red oil, rather than dark with sediment. I replaced the hex bolt.

I removed the screen behind the cover with the arrows and quickly removed whatever debris I saw and replaced it, and the O ring seemed to cooperate in remaining in place (I did not replace the O ring).

I shut off the oil supply at the end of the copper tube and replaced the oil filter, along with two of the three rubber washers. Following the directions on the replacement General filter package, I did not loosen the lower bolt, and so did not replace that washer. I did my best to tighten but not over tighten the filter canister, and to have it on correctly, but there is a drop or two of oil so I may have to redo that.

I turned the oil supply back on. I then loosened but did not remove the hex bolt, and pushed the reset button about a half dozen times, trying to tighten the hex bolt closed as the pump was running. I never felt that it was completely primed, but I'm beyond my knowledge at this point.

When hitting the reset button, the pump would run and (I think I heard) the electric starter activate, but it never fired (lit).

So, to recap, the oil ran out, I received a delivery, waited, tried to restart, it restarted twice but stalled, I asked for help here, drained the "bad" oil, removed any sediment from the screen behind the cover with the arrows, and replaced the filter and all but one of the associated rubber washers. Since then I have tried to bleed the system of any air, but have not had any luck in having the oil lighting.

I would appreciate any guidance. If it were cold, I would have already called someone in, but Spring seems to have sprung and the warmer weather has given me a little more time (so far) to try to fix this myself.

One other thing, the internet indicated that if the reset button was lit (back-lit), in order to completely reset the system, you would have to hold the reset button for at least 40 seconds. I did this a few times, but the oil has not ignited yet.

I opened the sight glass (for lack of a better term) to the chamber and saw no evidence of oil within, which put me at ease because it would seem to indicate I don't have to worry about a delayed ignition with excess oil in the box after pressing the reset button repeatedly.

Anyone have advice on what to try next?

Thanks,
Chris
 
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Old 04-02-15, 06:03 PM
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On the bottom of your pump you should have what looks like a grease fitting. That is where you bleed the air from the oil line.
Everything must be completely air tight before bleeding or you will continue to suck in air and it will never bleed. Tighten that filter. If it's dripping fix it. Make sure all fittings are tight.
It may take a few times for the burner to run depending on how much air.
When you get a good steady stream of oil from the fitting, close it and it will allow the oil to go to the nozzle and light the fire.
Do not unscrew that grease fitting all the way out, just loosen until air and the oil comes out.
3/8" wrench I believe unless that might be metric on that burner.
Good Like,
 
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Old 04-03-15, 06:08 AM
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Spott his pump does not have a normal look like grease fitting to bleed the pump , the hex nut is the bleed port. I would recommend that the hex nut be completely removed again since he replaced the filter and bleed again . There is a way to jumper the wiring when the control box is removed to keep the burner running while bleeding the pump , I would have to look at connections to tell you how ,maybe some one else can . The nozzle may be plugged if the burner fails to fire after bleeding.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 04:16 PM
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Saves,
You are right. In post #3 in the 3rd pic from bottom it is the brass looking nut that must be removed and bled.
They actually make a tool or long brass peace that screws into there to make it easier and one with a pressure gauge attached which can be adjusted by the the screw right above the bleed port if need be.
As far as the jumper goes it's terminals #5&#6 which I didn't mention not knowing the skill level.
You can see demos on YouTube.
I know some things are crap but they do occasionally hit the mark.
Search RIELLO MECTRON 5 and see what interests you.
Good Luck,
 
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