What is a fair price to replace a Residential Gas Boiler for Hydronic Heating?

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Old 04-07-15, 07:09 PM
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What is a fair price to replace a Residential Gas Boiler for Hydronic Heating?

My Utica 50,000 BTU boiler is from 1991 and I assume it was installed around that year (I am second owner). What is a fair price to replace this type of boiler with a new one? Assuming a new boiler costs $1,500, how much would labor and parts be in NJ? Just looking not to get ripped off. Thank you.
 
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Old 04-07-15, 08:04 PM
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Hi runner..

IMO in nj for the boiler you state I would say 4500 - 5000 K max... If higher then that they are selling you a pipe dream..


Just my opinion but I have been doing it 30 years..

If you get into HE then more $$$..

I have seen rip off guys charging 10-15K for basic boilers...

Insane!!!!
 
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Old 04-07-15, 08:06 PM
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50 k boiler? How big is the home?

What county are you roughly?

What heat emmitters in the home? Basboard?

Can you take a pic of the currnet boiler?

And whats wrong with it? Seems not too old...
 
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Old 04-07-15, 08:36 PM
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2 zones (2 floors). About 1500 SQ. Baseboards. In the last year I had to change the following. Relief Valve (started leaking and flooded a bit), Zone Valve (kept getting stuck open), and expansion tank (was all water inside it). So I have spent about $400 bucks into the system so far.

We have been getting very cold winters last few years and the last thing I need is for the boiler to break or something else to go break and paying a fortune to getting it replaced or pipes freezing. The circulator pump and auto fill/pressure reducer are old (installed same time that boiler was installed) and in order to replace them the system would need to be drained and re-piped.

When I had my expansion tank replaced, I had a valve installed so I can replace them in the future without draining the system.

How long are these boilers good for? Should I just replace the pump and auto-fill/pressure reducer as far as preventative maintenance? What else can I do in the off season in order to maintain the system? Change the pilot, clean it, or should I just replace the system?

My other option is using my excising duct-work that I have for Central AC and install a furnace and do forced hot air, but I don't know if that would be a better option.
 
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Old 04-07-15, 10:37 PM
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Safety valves should be replaced every five years as a matter of routine maintenance. Bladder type expansion tanks also are considered consumable and may last ten years or so. Same with the pressure reducing (fill) valve. Circulators can last a very long time or die without warning although the latter is rare. Having isolation valves on both sides of the pump allow for easy replacement. Air vents are another consumable item that may fail at any time.

The boiler itself however should last a minimum of thirty years and fifty years is not out of the realm of possibility. It DOES need fireside cleaning at least every other year and the smokestack/exhaust stack needs to be checked every year for weak spots or holes.

I would advise you to add the isolation valves for the circulator pump and change out the pressure reducing valve. Have on hand a spare air vent or two and install an isolation valve to allow the air vent to be replaced without draining the system. Give the firesides a good cleaning, replace any deteriorated smoke pipe and clean the pilot burner and you should be good.
 
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Old 04-08-15, 04:17 AM
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This pic is old, now from the green thing where the airvent is on top of there is an isolation valve on the bottom of it and to that the expansion tank is connected. On top of the green thing is an air vent. Does that green thing need to be replaced as well?

[img=http://s28.postimg.org/ivui6dxnt/vent1.jpg]

I have 2 boilers (identical) since it's a duplex type of home. I believe the pressure reducing fill valve is linked for both units? Anyhow, here is a picture.

[img=http://s18.postimg.org/fb8oo5h7p/fill_valvle.jpg]

Again this photo is a little older and I also had the flutes sloped correctly (in this pic they are not).

What is a fair price with labor for the following:

1) Replacing fill valve and adding isolation valves?
2) Adding isolation valves for the circulator pump?

Thanks
 

Last edited by runner1980; 04-08-15 at 04:37 AM.
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Old 04-08-15, 07:47 AM
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What is a fair price with labor for the following:

1) Replacing fill valve and adding isolation valves?
2) Adding isolation valves for the circulator pump?
IMO you change these things when they stop working.. As long as the boiler is not leaking then the rest of the items are only controls and such..

Of course the boilers below in your pic are not pretty. This can be fixed if you get a competent person in there. Whoever been working on those boilers needs a lesson in wiring.

Zone valve wires look like spaghetti, cover missing off aquastat...etc..

Some paper towels, Windex, and a vacuum will do wonders. You have valves at the supply and return so you can isolate the boiler and pumps as it is now. And whats wrong with the fill valve? There should be one for the boiler on the right also...








 
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Old 04-08-15, 08:15 AM
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Ok thanks for the info. I will clean it up this offseason. Is $150.00 a fair price to replace a relief valve?
 
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Old 04-08-15, 08:41 AM
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Is $150.00 a fair price to replace a relief valve?
Yes sounds fair... .
 
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Old 04-09-15, 03:14 PM
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Is one boiler doing each half? 1500 sq. ft. sounds right but two boilers?
Maybe hook the systems together instead of running both boilers.
 
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