taco circulator pump

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Old 10-20-15, 01:04 PM
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taco circulator pump

I am going to be replacing a taco circulator pump, and i was wondering if i have to drain the whole system, of if i can just close the valves above the pumps? i am attatching a picture.
http://s97.photobucket.com/user/fran...ojswh.jpg.html
 
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Old 10-20-15, 01:22 PM
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There is a valve located above the pumps - but I don't see any valves below the pumps. Maybe they are outside the view of the photo? Without valves that isolate the pumps from the system, you will need to drain to below the pump elevation. Now might be a good time to add additional valves if required in the future.

Stand back and take several wide-angle photos that show much more of the system from various angles.

P.S. What is wrong with the pump that requires replacement? Those Taco pumps just have one moving part - the rotor, which is replaceable.
 

Last edited by gilmorrie; 10-20-15 at 01:25 PM. Reason: PS
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Old 10-20-15, 01:55 PM
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There are no valves below the pumps. The pump on the right is dead. I was just wondering if water would come up from below if I closed the valves above. I suppose i could learn how to drain and refill the boiler if I had to.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 04:27 PM
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I was just wondering if water would come up from below if I closed the valves above.
Yes, it will.

The pump on the right is dead.
That's a bit unusual. Do you have a mulitimeter and know how to use it safely? Have you verified that you are getting 120V to the electrical junction box mounted on the side of the pump when there is a call for heat? If not, then replacing the pump won't help - you would need to troubleshoot to find out why you aren't getting power to the pump.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 04:58 PM
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I connected power directly to the pump, it didn't turn on.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 05:11 PM
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Why not just replace the "cartridge" or aka the armature as suggested by gil; there's nothing in the rest of the pump to have worn out (maybe the gasket?).
 
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Old 10-20-15, 05:16 PM
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Thing is, a new 007 complete pump is darn near the same price as a new cartridge... and you still have to drain the boiler.

$78

http://www.supplyhouse.com/Taco-007-...5-HP-1983000-p

$63

http://www.supplyhouse.com/Taco-007-...07CI-4116000-p

Frank, are there similar shut off valves on the SUPPLY side of the boiler piping? In other words, can you isolate the SYSTEM from the BOILER with valves?

If so, you won't need to drain all that much water... just the boiler itself.

Take a bunch more pics of all the piping around the boiler.

P.S. I used to work within 200 yards of the Kramer factory and am friends with one of the guys who 'designed' them way back when. Let's not get off topic though, but here's links to view:
http://vintagekramer.com/company76.htm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdZSUpy6a0I
 
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Old 10-20-15, 07:58 PM
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Cool kramer stuff!
The pipes with the pumps and shutoff valves are marked upstairs and downstairs return. Below that there is a pipe that appears to be a supply pipe. That pipe also has a shutoff valve, and some sort of relief valve.
I also have aa R8845U switching relay on the way. The one I have now is not functioning properly. If you poke the circuit board, it cuts in and out. I will connect the new one and make sure that it sends power to the pump before I buy a new pump.
As I mentioned before, I connected power straight to the bad pump, and it didn't work. I also swapped the wires with the good pump, and it still didn't work.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 08:12 PM
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Yeah, it was cool to be around that scene back in the day... Unk is a good guy.

If you poke the circuit board, it cuts in and out.
Pop the board out, turn it over and resolder the cracked solder connections at the relays.

Take more pics... there's no substitute for being able to see it.
 
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Old 10-21-15, 07:37 AM
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I took a couple more pics. The one with the red handle looks to me like it supplies water to the boiler, it connects to the same pipe as the pumps, just below them. There is what looks like a drain valve below it on the same pipe.
http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l2...pstlfhq46e.jpg http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l2...psf8rojswh.jpg
 
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Old 10-21-15, 09:03 AM
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Take a bunch more pics of all the piping around the boiler.
A BUNCH is not two. Need to see EVERYTHING in order to help.
 
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Old 10-21-15, 09:50 AM
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Old 10-22-15, 12:07 PM
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I am just wondering if i close all valves that supply and return water to the boiler, all i will have to drain is the boiler itself? as opposed to the whole house.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 08:50 AM
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Better question is, how do I refill it.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 11:36 AM
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Better question is, how do I refill it.
Temporarily lift the lever on the pressure reducing valve, a.k.a. automatic fill valve, while keeping an eye on the pressure gauge to avoid over-pressurizing the boiler. Vent as required.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 04:35 PM
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So basically open all the valves I would close to work on the pump, then turn it back on with the pressure relief valve open?
 

Last edited by frankjc; 10-25-15 at 05:10 PM.
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Old 10-25-15, 05:43 PM
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Please read this:

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...sion-tank.html

Since you will be de-pressurizing the boiler to work on the pump it would be an ideal time to service your expansion tank as well. The thread above has step by step instructions to do so.

Consider adding the extra bits if you want to make future life easier when servicing or replacing the expansion tank.

So basically open all the valves I would close to work on the pump, then turn it back on with the pressure relief valve open?
No... I think you may be confusing pressure RELIEF with pressure REDUCING valve.

When you replace the pump, close the MAIN WATER FEED valve, close the valves above each pump, close the valves over on the supply side at the other end of the loop.

After you fill the boiler back up after replacing the pump by opening the main water feed, and BEFORE OPENING the other valves, connect garden hose to the drains BELOW the shutoff valves on the return, just above the pumps.

These two, NOT the ones above the shutoff valves!


Vent air from each of those pipes.

You should hear air escaping from the air vent on the main supply line above the expansion tank. This thing (it's called a SpiroVent by the way):



Once you've done this, you can open all the valves and start the system back up.

You MAY hear some air gurgling through the pipes but don't worry about it... your AUTOMATIC AIR VENT (the brass thing above the expansion tank) will take out the rest of the air in a short time.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 06:43 PM
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Thank you very much! Can't wait to get this done.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 06:51 PM
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By the way...

You only need to lift that lever if you are not the patient type. It's called a FAST FILL lever and bypasses the regulating portion of that valve (which is set to 12-15 PSI).

It allows you to get water into the system faster (thus the name!).

If you are patient, you can just wait until the boiler comes up to pressure.

If you DO use the fast fill lever, make sure to keep an eye on the boiler pressure gauge and don't go above 15 PSI when you fill it.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 06:58 PM
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Exellent, thank you again!
 
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Old 11-20-15, 03:29 PM
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I'd like to say thank you again NJT. I finally got around to replacing my circulator pump and relay. Your detailed post was very helpful. Thanks again.
 
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