IBC dual condensing Combi boiler

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Old 11-12-15, 08:18 PM
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IBC dual condensing Combi boiler

Good evening, we have an old cast iron boiler in our 4 plex in western Canada. The boiler is 38 years old and our plumber says its time to replace it. The 4 suites are around 1100 sq. ft each and he is proposing using a combi boiler for heating and domestic water and its around 33-160,000 BTU/hr. Has anyone had any success with this boiler brand?

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Old 11-12-15, 09:06 PM
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The boiler is 38 years old and our plumber says its time to replace it.
Why? Are you hearing noise about how the new whizz bang will save you 150% of your fuel usage or some such nonsense?

What's wrong with the old one?
 
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Old 11-13-15, 06:36 AM
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The IBC DC / HC boilers are great units.
They are made in Europe by Intergas, and they have over a million boilers out there in the market.
This is the same boiler as the Triangletube Challanger, with a built in pump.

If installed correctly, it will be a great system.
Let me ask you this,
Is the system zoned, or will it be ? If so you may need a buffer tank.
How does he intend for a 125,000 BTU boiler to supply enough hot water to satisfy a four plex ? Even the DC 160,000 will only use 125,000 BTU FOR DOMESTIC WATER, unless they have changed things recently.

The boiler is a great idea, if you want to lower fuel bills, but don't let him use a combi boiler for DHW needs at this 4 plex or your phone will be ringing every morning.
 
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Old 11-13-15, 07:22 AM
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Our plumber cleaned the boiler last year and noticed a lot of rust coming from the exchanger. He is also concerned with the noise coming from it. He couldn't say that it will last the winter, he is concerned about it and it its age. He would like to install this IBC condensing boiler and attach to it an 80 gallon double coil EcoKing hot water tank for domestic hot water storage. If I could delay replacing this boiler I would. I know the boiler is almost 40 years old and in the cold months is costing us about $400.00 a month just on gas to run it and the 2 hot water tanks. We have done our best to keep it clean and to replace components that need to be replaced but eventually all things break down. If I had no tenants, we could delay it but if it does crap out in January and pipe freeze, yes I am concerned.

IBC 30-160 HE Boiler
80 Gal double coil EcoKing hot water tank
 
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Old 11-13-15, 04:07 PM
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If I were you I would stick with a conventional cast iron boiler with an indirect water heater.

You would do better to spend the money on insulation and sealing air infiltration. THAT is where the fuel savings START!

I don't know the IBC brand, but in general, condensing boilers cost more in upkeep. They need a more rigorous maintenance than a cast iron and will cut into any potential savings on fuel.

And that's POTENTIAL savings on fuel. Remember that if you can't heat the home in the coldest weather with 135F water, you end up right back at standard efficiency numbers. That's what they WON'T tell you when they do their sales pitch.

By the way... these 'noises'... do you hear them too? What do they sound like?
 
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Old 11-17-15, 05:27 PM
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The IBC boiler would be well mated to an IBC indirect...

I am no fan of the ecoking line.

NTI has an awesome single coil tank (or dual, but why do you need it) that is very cost effective and is 100% Stainless Steel.

NJ is right, when the return water temps get much above 133 F the condensing of flue gas falls off and you loss that edge that these boiler have, BUT you still get a modulating boiler that will match it's output with the heat loss of the house. This eliminates standby losses associated with fixed fire natural draft boilers. It also reduce wear and tear on the gas valve and ignitor (if equipped).

The IBC has a cast aluminum heat exchanger, much like the CI boilers.
It has mass, it reads the block temp (not water temp) and generally is a very simple unit. Sure more can go wrong with them, but I like to think there value (saving fuel) outweighs the additional costs associated with them.
The old mid effiecent stuff is a thing of the past, it's being legislated out, and costs of the boiler are now comparable with CI stuff (at least here).
 

Last edited by NJT; 11-18-15 at 08:46 AM.
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