OK to use Sharkbite on fin-tube system?

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Old 11-17-15, 08:14 AM
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OK to use Sharkbite on fin-tube system?

The first thing I did when I bought my lakefront cottage was remove the 2 old 6' doorwalls and replace them with 3-panel (9') Andersen units. The installers were careful not to disturb the fin-tube radiators that were near. Those strips were out of the way of the 6' windows but intrude into the passage of the wider units--so my plan was to replace them with shorter units. Now I'm considering under-floor radiators that would be completely out of view. 2 questions:

1 - are there radiator units just like toe-kick heaters--but mount between the joists and blow heat through ordinary floor grilles?

2 - can Sharkbite push-in connectors be used on hydronic systems? I've always been a little suspicious of them but I've only read good things here.

I have a basement under this part of the cottage so this could end up a pretty easy job.

 
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Old 11-17-15, 02:55 PM
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1 - are there radiator units just like toe-kick heaters--but mount between the joists and blow heat through ordinary floor grilles?
Yes. I know that B-M makes floor mount boxes for the toe-kick heaters.

They call it a 'floor mount kit' or some such... PDFs down the right side. They also have recessed wall mount kits too.

Beacon/Morris Residential, Commercial, Heat, Hot Water, Steam, Gas, Kickspace Heaters, Hydronic, Oil.

Which way do the joists run? Left to right along the doors? If so, you can also install a 'trough' for the baseboard... but I can't seem to locate the product in a quick search.

edit: here it is, just had to remember the name of it!

http://www.slantfin.com/index.php/pr...onic-floor-box

Basically it's a long grille and trough that mounts in front of the doors into which the fintube element is installed. If the joists butt to that wall though, fuggeddaboudit.

Yeah, supposedly you can use sharkbite for that, but I personally would not. Call me old fashioned, but that's my feeling.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 08:11 AM
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Great links, thanks! The joists do butt into that wall but at least I have the option of a small heater unit between the joists.
The entire cottage is one continuous loop so I need to pick the unit carefully since I can't throttle the flow to them.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 08:48 AM
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Consider closing the loop with solid pipe where you remove the baseboards and tap into that with monoflo tees for the heater(s). That way the flow through the loop will not be restricted by the heaters and you could put valves on the taps to throttle the flow to the heaters down if you need to. But I doubt that you would need to do that.
 
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Old 11-19-15, 07:08 AM
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Sounds like a good solution. I still don't fully understand parallel plumbing in heating systems...would the supply & return tees need to be close together or can they be near the corners of the room?
 
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Old 11-19-15, 08:04 AM
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I still don't fully understand parallel plumbing in heating systems
By parallel plumbing you mean the use of VENTURI TEES? aka MONOFLO ?

Using straight tees with no means of creating pressure differential doesn't work, you have no control over how much water flows between, or around, the tees.

Venturi tees create a pressure differential that forces flow in both branches.

You COULD use standard tees as long as you have throttling valves BETWEEN them and also in the BRANCH run so that you could adjust flow. (or, if you can find one, a THREE WAY valve. That way you would not have to adjust TWO valves to divert flow to the heater branch... but venturi tees will be just fine.)
 

Last edited by NJT; 11-19-15 at 02:38 PM.
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Old 11-19-15, 01:53 PM
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See the piping diagram for one-pipe up-feed connection on page 4 of Brochure Twin-Flo Kickspace Heaters (TWFII-10R) (575KB) from the Beacon-Morris link that NJT gave. It shows where venturi tees are needed and minimum/maximum spacing.
 
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Old 11-20-15, 07:32 AM
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Thanks again. I downloaded and printed those installation instructions to review this weekend.

The only installation problem I see is the Beacon Morris under-floor kit mounts the heater at an angle for some reason & that makes it stick down below the bottom of the joist. I think I have room above the suspended ceiling, but it limits my options for finishing the ceiling in the future.
 
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Old 11-20-15, 07:38 AM
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I think I have room above the suspended ceiling, but it limits my options for finishing the ceiling in the future.
I thought you said basement below... I took that to mean unfinished, but what you're saying is that the space below is finished?
 
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Old 11-20-15, 08:14 AM
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Look at Fig. E & F in the Floor Kit Installation Instructions. If you add the discharge duct and deflector as shown, I'll bet you could install the unit up inside the joists. I think the sloped side panel is just there because it is needed for installation perpendicular to the joists. You could use some strapping attached to the bottom of the joists (or some lighting fixture mounts that expand across the space) to hold the unit in place. You might have to fill the space on the sides between the unit and the joists to make sure the incoming air comes from the floor opening and not from the ceiling space although that may not be critical if the basement is heated (as long as the heated air from the unit is directed up through the floor opening).

Be aware that the units are noisy. If the space below is a sleeping area that could be a problem.
 
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