honeywell and taco mix question uncalled for heat

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Old 03-12-16, 04:29 AM
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honeywell and taco mix question uncalled for heat

I have a peerless boiler with a domestic water jacket using a Honeywell L8124A,C L8151A aquastat. I also have an outdoor furnace. I have a taco circulator on the outside furnace to a heat exchanger. The other side has a continuously running taco circulator pump that circulates water through the inside boiler. I have three zones inside, each with a taco pump and a flo-chek valve. The issue is that even though the zones aren't calling for heat, the water will circulate anyway. i'm not a heating guy, but got the idea that because the inside pump runs continuosly, it pulls water through the zones. I thought i could put taco or honeywell zone valves on each zone, and that would prevent circulation unless it was called for by that zone's thermostat. That may or not be the best solution, but if i did it that way, what kind of equipment would i need to buy? Will zone valves work off this aquastat. There currently is one circ running off the honeywell aquastat, and there are two external boxes connected to the other two zone thermostats that feed the other two circ pumps and also are wired back somehow to the main honeywell aquastat. I think that's so they will fire the boiler if needed, and allow for disconnect by the main power switch. As i said the big issue is we get really hot in the zones especially in spring and fall. i don't run the outdoor furnace in the summer. i thought the flo-cheks would prevent that, maybe they aren't doing their job, or someone suggested the circ pumps are worn and allowing flow through. All inside equipment is 15 years old.
 
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Old 03-12-16, 05:50 AM
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A few pictures would help but I am foreseeing the problem is a constant run circulator. Maybe have the circ run only when the heat is needed, dependent on what zone panels you are using.
 
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Old 03-12-16, 07:45 AM
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here are some pics

Thanks for the reply. I think i have to have the continuous run circulator to keep the water jacket hot.

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Old 03-12-16, 04:38 PM
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What is the model of the 2 controls on the wall,also it seems like the best way to control the zones is by zone valves on each and control the boiler from their end switches, what controls the loop out to the outside boiler, why is that cir running constantly?
P/S your not in Barttlet ,NH are you?
 
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Old 03-12-16, 06:05 PM
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controls on wall

the controls on wall are Honeywell, under the cover it says 8619 and RA89A 1074. I'm in Monroe, NH. My outside furnace is a Central Boiler. The place i bought it from recommended running a pump outside continuously for the one side of the heat exchanger, and then run another pump on the inside of the heat exchanger to circulate through the furnace to keep the water jacket hot. The outside boiler just cycles for heat on it's own with a passive draft opening and closing between 175 and 185.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 06:13 AM
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Has this always been the case with the water circulating through the zones with no call for heat?I wonder if there is a valve stuck open ?the 2 controls on the wall are switching relays which should be controlling the cir's one for each zone,from an electrical stand point it would take some rewiring for the zone valves.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 08:26 AM
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circuilating

Yes, the water always seemed to circulate some even when no heat was called for, but it may have gotten worse.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 02:53 PM
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This article maybe of some interest.
The Flo-Control Valve
The principle that made gravity hot water heat work (the fact that hot water will rise because it weighs less than cold water) is the very thing Flo-Control valves are designed to stop.
In the days of gravity heat, circulators weren’t available, so installers used large pipes and let the water “turn” slowly on its own. But nowadays, heating pipes are much smaller and every hot water system has a circulator.

The only time hot water should leave a modern boiler is when a thermostat calls for the circulator to come on. If hot water is unchecked and allowed to “gravity circulate” out of the boiler when the circulator is off, the zone will overheat, and you’ll have a call-back.

So when you zone with circulators, you’ll use Flo-Control valves to keep the hot water in the boiler. Let’s take a look inside one.

How it works…
This is B&G’s SA valve. “SA” stands for “straight or angle,” which means, for piping convenience, you can use either the bottom or side tapping of the Flo-Control valve as an inlet. Naturally, there’s only one outlet.



As you can see, there’s a weight inside the Flo-Control valve. It’s made of bronze, and it rides up on the valve stem whenever the circulator operates. When the circulator shuts off, the bronze weight drops back down onto the seat. The weight prevents gravity circulation when the zone is off.

To work, the Flo-Control valve must be installed with the stem pointed toward the ceiling. You should always install the Flo-Control valve in the supply piping because the system water is hottest at this point. There are times, however, when you may need a second Flo-Control valve on the return side of the boiler because, believe it or not, gravity circulation can occur in a single pipe! It doesn’t need a complete loop.

The hot and cold water just flow past each other in the same pipe. You’ll usually notice this “back end” gravity circulation if there’s a radiator directly above the boiler on the return side. Adding a second Flo-Control valve to the return side of the zone piping will solve the problem every time.



If you turn the stem handle at the top of the Flo-Control valve counter-clockwise, you’ll manually lift the bronze weight from its seat. This will effectively take the Flo-Control valve “out of the loop” and allow the boiler to gravity circulate.

The only time you’d want to do this, however, is if the circulator failed. Turning the stem handle and lifting the weight will give the folks some heat during the time the circulator is down. But this is essentially a home owner feature because, let’s face it, if you’re there on the service call, you’re usually going to fix the circulator, not bypass the Flo-Control valve.

Turning the stem handle has no effect on the system other than to allow gravity circulation to take place. In other words, that stem handle won’t help you balance the system’s flow rate or direct the flow in any other way. Its only function is to raise and lower the bronze weight.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 04:07 PM
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flo chek

Thanks. i might take a look at my flo cheks and make sure they're functioning properly.
 
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