Heating basement workshop


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Old 03-18-16, 12:57 PM
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Heating basement workshop

Hello,

I live in Wasilla Alaska and I am finishing some space in my basement for a workshop and am wondering what is the best way to heat the space. It is 25' x 18' 4" x 9', ~460 square feet, or ~4120 cubic feet. The space above (master suite) has radiant floor heat. One 25' wall and one 18' wall face to the outside. The outside walls have R19 insulation and I can put additional insulation in the newly framed walls (2 x 4) built next to the concrete foundation. Either way I will be using 3/4" osb and 5/8" drywall for the walls and 2 layers of 5/8 drywall on the ceiling (ceiling joists are insulated with R13 as well).

My plan is to add another circuit from my radiant floor heat system. My main question is does it matter where radiant heaters are installed? I want to put them nearer the ceiling so they are up out of harms way and also do not take up valuable floor space. Also about how many feet of heater would be required? The basement stays 50+ degrees even on the coldest days (I assume mostly due to the heat from above which I again assume will be lost when I add drywall to the ceiling). There are no windows and one 36" door to the outside. Thanks for any help you can provide.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 02:04 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I would consider a water to air heat exchanger or a Hot Water Hanging Unit Heater. I am not an HVAC pro so I can't tell you what size you would need.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 03:48 PM
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There are details concerning insulating basement walls which i won't go into, since they are already done. As for heat, like any room, the cold air migrates to the floor and it your only heat is up high, it will tend to stay there.

The two layers of drywall on the ceiling sounds like you want some sound isolation. If so, consider mounting the drywall to isolation strips to mechanically decouple the drywall from the floor joists.

As for the amount of heat, a simple heat loss calculation for that space would give you a number.

Your radiant floor heat should be a reduced temperature supply. More details would be needed to determine if you can extend the existing loop to provide more low temperature radiant heat. if you want a high temperature source for this space you will need to run a new loop.

Questions:
Were you intending to use low temperature radiant heat for this space?
What is going on the floor?
Is your boiler naturally drafted drawing its combustion air from this space?

Bud
 
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Old 03-18-16, 05:35 PM
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Thanks for the welcome Tolyn! I will have to look into your suggestions to see just what they are. Thanks.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 05:52 PM
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Bud9051 - Yes, the double layer is for sound isolation. I considered channel and clips + DD (I will be using this method of sound iso when I get to the home theater part of the basement) but I think the double drywall plus the already existing floor insulation will be enough. It's already almost passable in its current state so double 5/8 drywall should get it done. In reference to insulating basement walls I assume you are talking about using foam board vs fiberglass and I still am hesitant about not going that route. It is not too late to remove the R19 bats and replace with rigid foam boards as I can still get access through the framing (16" oc).

As for your questions - Yes my system is low temp and I plan to use that. The floor is a DriCore panel sub-floor and I have not determined what I will put over this. I have seen a few guys just epoxy over the DriCore osb layer and it looks pretty good but I am leaning towards some type of engineered hardwood or some kind of resilient floor material like you would find on gym floors (rubber). My system uses two Burnham boilers that get their air supply from outside the house. The previous owner (and builder) said the system was designed to heat the whole house but he never got around to finishing the basement. There are still 5 unused zone slots on the control panel.
 
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Old 03-18-16, 06:17 PM
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Your call, but a layer of rigid behind the studs provides a non-condensing surface to prevent basement air from adding to the moisture inside the wall. It also isolates the fiberglass insulation from the concrete and moisture which will migrate through the foundation.

The Dricore will at least get your feet up off or the concrete.

Personally, I hate basements as they are a hole in the ground waiting for a disaster and I have seen too many. But most places love them, at least where they can install them. High risk, but high reward.

Good luck and stay warm

Bud
 
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Old 03-19-16, 09:13 AM
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Have you considered using PEX radiant tubing in the floor? Is there insulation below the concrete? If there is then you could use a channelled subfloor like Quik Trak Quik Trak , Wirsbo Quik Trak , Wirsbo Quik Trak Panels - SupplyHouse.com on top of the concrete with a finished floor above. If the floor is not already insulated, then you could put foam board down and then the subfloor on top of that. I am not familiar with Dricore but that may also provide the insulation you would need below a radiant floor installation.

Do a heat loss calculation to find out how much heat you need to add to the space. A radiant floor may not provide all you need but the warm floor will definitely be a better alternative than heaters up high. And it will be out-of-the-way (just no nailing into the floor!!)

If the heat needed is only slightly more that you can get from a radiant floor installation you could consider putting some in the walls also. Maybe not as efficient as a radiator or convector, but in a workshop with a warm floor it might be satisfactory. Keeping the feet warm does wonders in such an environment.
 
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Old 03-19-16, 01:29 PM
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What is this area going to be used for? If a lot of dust/dirt you will have to limit yourself to what you use. I would consider radiant tubing in the ceiling. A room that size you can do about 13k or heat as a guess. Do your heat loss and see what you need. As long as you are working at desks it would be comfortable.
The thing with radiant ceilings you can run a bit hotter if need be and not worry about the max 85f floor temperature. Radiant tubing in the ceiling will do a good job and not stay at the ceiling.
 
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Old 03-22-16, 04:52 AM
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Radiant wall ceiling may work very well for you in this application.
 
 

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