Enclosing Boiler

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Old 08-28-16, 04:30 PM
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Enclosing Boiler

Attached is a picture of the boiler in my house. It is located in my basement underneath my kitchen. It heats my domestic hot water and my hot water radiators.
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Might sound crazy but this thing radiates a serious amount of heat. At any given time you can feel the kitchen floor and it is warm to the touch above the boiler.

Is there any way I can enclose this into a sort of boiler room and insulate/vent it to keep the heat in the boiler and prevent it from countering my Air Conditioner?

Its probably good in the winter, but my kitchen is constantly like 85 degrees even with the AC on
 
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Old 08-28-16, 04:46 PM
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What is the temperature on the boiler gauge ?
 
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Old 08-28-16, 04:49 PM
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Where is the heat coming from - the boiler itself? Do you have to keep your boiler continuously hot all summer for DHW? If so, change your system or controls to avoid that.

Or, are your radiators warm when heat is not being called for? I see what appears to be a red flo-control valve - could that be leaking by, causing gravity flow?

Where are you located? Oil or natural gas?

Your near-boiler piping is difficult to follow. None of the piping seems to be insulated. Why?
 
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Old 08-28-16, 08:00 PM
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The gauge is typically at 180.

It is an Oil burner and it is our only source of hot water so yes, it runs year round. Currently the heating part of the boiler is shut off because I am swapping a ridiculously large radiator for a smaller one so the system is drained and the DHW is the only part that is operational.

I will eventually insulate all of the pipes, but I bought this home in a pretty neglected condition. A WHOLE LOT of stuff is done in a pretty haggard manner.

The heat is really just radiating off of the boiler in general. The Chimney is flowing well and the hot water pipes are warm as they normally are unless the hot water is being run.
 
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Old 08-28-16, 08:40 PM
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Yes... do away with the tankless coil and install an electric HWH...

You will save oodles of $$$$
 
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Old 08-28-16, 08:44 PM
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Ok..... you need some aquastat work there. The boiler should be idling around 140 degrees when there is no call for heat. You're un-necessarily heating the water to 180 degrees when it's not required.

In the picture, on the upper right corner of the boiler, is a gray control box. Turn the service switch off to the boiler and remove that cover. Post the model number or even better shoot and post a picture of the insides of it. We can see what type of control it is and where it's set.
 
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Old 08-28-16, 09:14 PM
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It is a honeywell aquastat

Hi is 180
lo is 155
diff is between 10 and 15
 
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Old 08-28-16, 09:39 PM
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Turn the diff down all the way...10...

Hi is ok as the boiler will not run off Hi during summer..

Lo is fine too. 140F may be better but see how the HW is at that temp...If not turn it back up..

I would install an electric tank IMO... Tankless coil is worst way to heat HW... Like putting a pot on the stove...
 
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Old 08-29-16, 05:59 PM
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I agree with lawrosa - install a stand-alone domestic water heater, gas-fired if you could, electric if you must. Shut down your boiler in the summer. Your present setup is not ideal.
 
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