Wanting to redirect my baseboard heating system

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Old 11-22-16, 07:49 PM
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Wanting to redirect my baseboard heating system

First time visitor and poster here. I've been searching online for a couple days but have not found examples similar to my project.

So we want to remove an interior wall that has a baseboard heater, so I am trying to plan the redirecting project.

Here are the details of the system:
-The property is a ranch style duplex (I own both sides) with three loop zones from a single hot water boiler. One loop for our half, another for the other side, and a third for the shared garage.
-It's a pressurized system
-Domestic hot water is separate.
-The boiler sits in our laundry room with all pipes running below into the crawlspace and looping upwards only through the baseboards then down again.
-The current boiler was installed just a few years ago. The prior boiler was located in the crawlspace below the piping.

The trouble is, I've followed the loop down there, and I don't think there's any drain valve. The only one is near the bottom of the boiler (still above 99% of the piping), and it drains the entire system. I'd rather not disturb the tenents with having to access all their bleeder valves.

The only openings to our individual loop could be at the ball valves at the start and end of the loop, however it's not clear if I open the valve between those valves and the threaded cap ends, if I vent the main system or just my loop.

How do I drain just my loop so that I can do the pipe work in the crawlspace?

My only guess is to:
-shut off power to the whole system
-shut the valves to my loop
-let it cool down for a couple hrs
-start cutting the pipe in the crawlspace where I need to redirect it (straight across rather than upwards to the baseboard and down).

This would certainly drain the system, however I'm not 100% positive in the integrity of the loop valves. Anything less than a perfect seal and I won't be able to solder the new pipe in.

Any better ideas?

Thank you
 
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Old 11-25-16, 09:52 PM
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How do I drain just my loop so that I can do the pipe work in the crawlspace?
Quick way to drain that loop is to use a saddle valve.
I am a firm believer in worst-case-design and want to isolate any loop that has problems on a cold winter day. That way can keep other loops operational.

Each loop should have shut off and drain valves. Should also be able to isolate circulators. Use ball valves, not gate or globe valves which tend seize up over the years. Have 6 loops and recently had to replace many of mine.

Also put a shut off valve on the expansion tank fitting. It will make life a lot easier when you work on the system.

Air in systems is a "given". Use automatic vent valves on all loops. Vents near boilers are not completely effective.
 

Last edited by doughess; 11-25-16 at 10:09 PM.
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