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Raypak Boiler - exceeding high limit


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01-13-18, 08:11 AM   #1 (permalink)  
Raypak Boiler - exceeding high limit

I have a Raypak residential boiler with a Honeywell L6008G aquastat. The boiler used to get up to about 195 degrees before it turned off (pump continued, just gas turned off), but now, the boiler reaches 240 degrees and the high limit sensor (not part of the aquastat) shuts down the boiler. The aquastat was set at 180 degrees - I tried turning it down to 140 degrees and the problem continues.

Is there a fix, or maybe a reset button, for this situation or do I need to replace the aquastat? Just a FYI - the boiler is about 16-17 years old with the original aquastat.

Thanks - Adam

 
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01-13-18, 09:45 AM   #2 (permalink)  
Unless you have a wiring schematic and a voltmeter, and know how to safely troubleshoot the problem, you should call an experienced pro. The problem could be a wiring problem, the aquastat, etc. This is a dangerous situation, and the 240-deg hi limit is too high and, in any case should not be relied upon.

 
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01-13-18, 10:54 AM   #3 (permalink)  
At the very least we'd need a full model number of the boiler.


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01-13-18, 12:05 PM   #4 (permalink)  
The Raypak model is H3-0180B.

Thanks - Adam

 
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01-13-18, 04:17 PM   #5 (permalink)  
By Googling the make and model, you can find the installation and operating instructions. The factory setting of the hi limit is 180deg, not 240deg. That degrades the safety protection provided. If I read your post correctly, the improperly set hi limit is being used as both the safety cutoff and the ordinary control device. In my opinion, this is unsafe.

There seem to be two problems going on. First, the aquastat isn't controlling the temp as it should. So, you are one failure away from potentially burning down your house. Secondly, the hi limit set way to high.

 
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01-13-18, 05:05 PM   #6 (permalink)  
Have a couple of estimates scheduled for Monday. Due to the age of the boiler, plus have never been happy with it since day one, will be replacing the boiler.

If if anyone has reccomendations of a good residential boiler, let me know. Not looking for the best of the best as I will be selling in 2 years.

Thanks.

 
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01-13-18, 05:37 PM   #7 (permalink)  
Due to the age of the boiler, plus have never been happy with it since day one, will be replacing the boiler.
How old is the boiler? Unless it is over 60 years old, you may be making a mistake If it's because of the hi-limit or the aquastat, then you are definitely making a mistake. I have a strong hunch that the people you've called, will agree with your idea of replacing the boiler, for maybe $10k or so.

 
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01-13-18, 05:51 PM   #8 (permalink)  
The boiler is about 17-18 years old. Google search said the lifespan of a boiler is between 10-15 years, so I assumed I was on borrowed time.

How long do the newer high efficiency boilers last on average?

 
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01-13-18, 06:09 PM   #9 (permalink)  
Looks like around 2003 for manufacturing. Interesting looking design. That should be a spring chicken for a boiler. I'd certainly have the aquastat replaced.

manuals/03b3c120-3cb4-429a-9764-13793134cd84.pdf


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01-14-18, 07:58 AM   #10 (permalink)  
"Google search said the lifespan of a boiler is between 10-15 years,"

That is incorrect. Google is off by a factor of three, at least. Boiler salesmen may claim that a new, more efficient boiler will quickly pay for itself in fuel savings. That also is false - replacement of a boiler that works can not be economically justified based on fuel savings.

 
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01-14-18, 01:53 PM   #11 (permalink)  
Does your boiler have an electronic controlled vent damper?

I have a slant fin that the auto vent damper failed open and the boiler would never stop boiling. all the safety fail checks did not catch that. Instead of trusting that, I have the loop back plug on the aquastat and a gravity damper.

 
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01-15-18, 05:51 PM   #12 (permalink)  
By the way - if, as you say, you intend to sell the house within two years, that's a big reason not to replace a relatively new boiler. What is the difference in the real estate value of a house that has a relatively new, working boiler versus one with a new boiler? Ask you realtor.

 
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01-16-18, 04:37 PM   #13 (permalink)  
The boiler has been problematic for the last 10+ years - probably could have bought 2 new ones with all the maintenance performed on it over the years. Either Rapak doesn't make good boilers or I got a lemon.

For poece of mind, I bought a new one. I'm usually away from home 2-3 weeks at a time several times a year during the winter months - just don't trust if.

New one came with 5 years parts and labor warranty and it is quiet as a mouse.

Thanks for for all the replies - Adam.

 
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