Hydronic floor heating expensive

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Old 02-10-18, 12:41 PM
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Hydronic floor heating expensive

We had a hydronic floor system installed in a concrete slab floor for our addition because it is supposed to be an efficient heating alternative..but our electric bill has exploded. Our installer said it takes a while for the slab to heat up. We turned on the system for the first time in December and now it is February, so how long does it take? He also said we should set the thermostat at 68 and the system would then just maintain heat. I am thinking that will just increase our electric bill more. The thermostat is set on 60 and we dont change it. Are we doing something wrong that is causing this to be a most inefficient and expensive heating option for us? Should we be turning it down at night and back up in the morning. Coukd there be something wrong with yhe system or settings? Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 
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Old 02-10-18, 12:46 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Why has the electric bill exploded ?
Do you have an electric boiler.... if not.... what do you have ?
 
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Old 02-10-18, 01:27 PM
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Yes..we have an electric boiler. I expected an increase but now our bill is almost twice as much as our bill used to be.
 
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Old 02-10-18, 01:56 PM
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B,
Not judging but an observation on my part. Probably radiant heat was not the best option to go with since you had an electric boiler and radiant, because it runs at a lower temp and heats objects and not the air or in your case the slab is really not made to be shut off or even lowered and then raised.

By lowering and raising you are obviously reheating everything you once had up to temp and with the cold objects or slab and the low temp of the water trying to heat the slab it's like starting all over and it will take forever to get it back up to temp..

The installer didn't do you any favors with this system with an electric boiler.

Ordinarily it would be mainly the pump that would constantly running. In your case it's the whole boiler. If your electric rates are like mine that's not good.

Radiant heat, although comfortable because of the way it heats is really made to run 24-7 to be effective.

Just my thoughts, hope this helps a little.
 
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Old 02-10-18, 02:32 PM
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Thank you for responding..my thoughts are the same.
 
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Old 02-10-18, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Buddah0109 View Post
We had a hydronic floor system installed in a concrete slab floor for our addition because it is supposed to be an efficient heating alternative..but our electric bill has exploded.
Compared to what "alternatives"?

Well, actually, an electric boiler is the most efficient - it's 100% thermally efficient - no losses. But electricity is the most expensive fuel, unless you maybe have a heat pump.

How well is your addition, including the slab, insulated?
 
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Old 02-10-18, 03:31 PM
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Did they put an insulating slab or membrane under your floor slab? Maybe your heating the ground.
Sid
 
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Old 02-10-18, 06:50 PM
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It is well insulated..the walls with 6 inches of fiberglass insulation and the roof has sprayed in expandable foam insulation. The floor was prepped with 4x8 sheets of 2 inch dense blue foam board.
 
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Old 02-10-18, 07:17 PM
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This may sound foolish but although your pipes are in concrete and seems to be the concern where is your stat located and is it actually calling for heat all that time with all that insulation.

Why is the addition so cold to keep the stat calling. It's the room temp and not the temp of the floor that's keeping the boiler on.

Just a thought.
 
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