Can't Keep Air Out of Pipes (Boiler)

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  #1  
Old 03-19-18, 10:02 AM
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Arrow Can't Keep Air Out of Pipes (Boiler)

A problem developed over the winter where our 2nd floor would get cold. The pipes were air locked so I'd go up and let the air out at our highest baseboard.

No problem.

A few weeks later it would happen again, and I'd repeat.

Now it's every other day. I bleed the air out until I get about straight water for awhile...then I go back and check a few hours later just in case. It sounds like water is just slushing around my downstairs pipes now too (not even hammering).

Maybe I have expansion tank issues? I'm not sure, where do you suggest looking next?

Thank you
 
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Old 03-19-18, 11:12 AM
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Most boiler systems have an automatic bleeder that continuously bleeds the air. If you can post a few pictures of your boiler and piping... we can comment further.

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Old 03-19-18, 11:42 AM
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Thank you. I attached 2. Is it on top of the tank?
 
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Old 03-19-18, 12:06 PM
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That device on top of the pressure tank is the bleeder. I don't recognize the type.
The boiler guys will stop thru and identify it.

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Old 03-19-18, 02:13 PM
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j,
That is called a Spirovent and is designed to take the lions share of the air out of the system and is a very good top of the line vent.

The bigger question here is how is the air getting into the system. What do you run your pressure at.

Hot water systems are closed systems and once the air is initially bled, unless the system is worked on or fresh water introduced there should be no more air problems.
 
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Old 03-19-18, 02:46 PM
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As Spott said, we need to know the pressure and temp reading on the boiler gauge. I don't see one in your photo of the boiler, but surely there must be one. Take a clear, in-focus, close-up photo of the gauge and let us read it - there may be some confusing scales.
 
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Old 03-19-18, 05:53 PM
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Thank you for the tips so far! I'll get a picture when I get home. Last I looked, the pressure gauge was at 18
 
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Old 04-05-18, 11:22 AM
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Over the last few weeks the pressure has settled here (image). We bled everything 4 days ago until approx 1/2 gallon of water came out upstairs (after getting air-less buckets downstairs at the boiler).

Air is back and water is sloshing around the pipes! Ugh.
 
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Old 04-05-18, 01:44 PM
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At that boiler temp.... you should have closer to 20psi of pressure in the system.

The water fill should bring the pressure to around 12psi and during heating it should rise.
 
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Old 04-06-18, 06:31 PM
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At 12 psi system pressure (above atmospheric), air can't "leak" into the system. If air is entering, perhaps it is from air dissolved in make-up water resulting from a water leak? I'm open to other suggestions.
 
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Old 04-07-18, 08:59 PM
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Pjmax: At that boiler temp.... you should have closer to 20psi of pressure in the system. The water fill should bring the pressure to around 12psi and during heating it should rise.

The function of expansion tanks is to main water pressure setting as temperature varies during normal course of operation. It should not rise with water temperature change.

A 50% + pressure rise from original/starting12 psi at 140F to 20 psi at 180F is abmornal.
 
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Old 04-16-18, 07:36 PM
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Everyone on this site gave me good advice. I suspect you have similar issues I had. My Extol expansion tank was bad and my pressure gauge was 5# high. I added the Spirovent, a ball valve with bleeder for Extol and a separate pressure gauge. It was interesting that the Extol passed the two hand tests, hot top, cold bottom and tapping top vs bottom. I decided to order one as itís inexpensive and installed it. But then I tested the old one in my garage. No air pressure and when I applied air it sputtered out the top fitting. My sloshing and gurgling water noise ceased after the repair.
Good luck.
 
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