How can you bring a 75-gallon water heater home?

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Old 07-05-18, 01:26 PM
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How can you bring a 75-gallon water heater home?

How can you bring home a 75-gallon gas water heater from HD?

I once brought a 50-gallon water heater home from HD using a CRV. It was about 150 lb in weight. It wasn't too bad. I asked a friend to stop by to help me unload it from the car.

For some reason, a 75-gallon is more than twice the weight than a 50-gallon. The one I'm looking at weights 350 lbs. I have access to a heavy duty dolly at work. I think I could muscle the beast down to the basement if I strap the water heater to the dolly and roll it down one step at a time with one person on top and another one at the bottom. I'm thinking to get a $20 truck from HD to haul the water heater home. I just don't know how to unload it from the truck. Any idea? Thanks!
 
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Old 07-05-18, 01:36 PM
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a ramp of some sort possibly or a couple of people to unload it a truck with a lift gate would also be an option.
 
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Old 07-05-18, 02:17 PM
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I'm curious - what will this 75-gal heater be used for? If it's a replacement of another 75-gal heater, the old heater is going to be heavier, due to lime buildup.

You could consider using two smaller heaters, piped in series. That would actually give a more thermodynamic efficient operation - the first heater could be operated at a lower temperature than the second.
 
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Old 07-05-18, 02:38 PM
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I'm curious - what will this 75-gal heater be used for?
Im curious why anybody would need something that large, having a 50 gallon unit and 2 teenage sons we've never needed that much hot water!
 
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Old 07-05-18, 03:05 PM
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To answer you question. Buy some 2 x 6 x 6 or 8 feet long and using a two wheeler or a 4 wheel dolly, carefully ride the tank down. As you bring the tank down the stairs, you might want to stick a few 2 x 4's to help support the tank and the two to three people walk it down as with bringing the old tank up. I ruptured a disk because the person below did not know how to support the tank as I let it down. BE CAREFUL!
 
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Old 07-05-18, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Marq1 View Post
Im curious why anybody would need something that large, having a 50 gallon unit and 2 teenage sons we've never needed that much hot water!
I have a 50-gallon BW right now. It is a power vent version. I live in a 3-story townhouse and the water heater is located in the basement (so 4 stories total). For some reason, there isn't enough hot water for two showers in a row in the morning. I guess it because of the distance. Most of my neighbors have 75-gallon version so I want to get a 75-gallon as well. I looked into tankless but I don't think I have enough gas in the line (I have two furnaces and a gas cooktop). The 75-gallon Rheem costs $1200 at HD. My next door neighbor paid $2600 to have the exact same model installed couple months ago. I guess most of the cost goes to transportation. A 40-gallon costs $800. I have a 4" PVC vent pipe. Can I use the same pipe to vent two 40-gallon units?
 
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Old 07-05-18, 05:22 PM
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A 40-gallon costs $800. I have a 4" PVC vent pipe. Can I use the same pipe to vent two 40-gallon units?
A 40-gal heater costs $800 - for pickup from HD and DIY install? That is total nonsense.

Are we talking about an atmospheric gas water heater, not condensing? If so, PVC venting is unacceptable. I think you would best call a professional.

A 50-gal heater can't supply two showers in a row? That is also ridiculous.
 
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Old 07-05-18, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Speed 30 View Post
A 40-gal heater costs $800 - for pickup from HD and DIY install? That is total nonsense.

Are we talking about an atmospheric gas water heater, not condensing? If so, PVC venting is unacceptable. I think you would best call a professional.

A 50-gal heater can't supply two showers in a row? That is also ridiculous.
I compared the prices at local HD and Menards, the 40-gallon power-vented gas heater costs about the same at both places. I don't have a chimney to vent the furnace and water heater from the basement to the roof. Both units use 4" PVC for venting. The PVC runs horizontally to the outside. If you buy a “natural-draft” type gas heater, it costs only $400 for similar model.

The house is 16 years old. I believe my BW is original. I guess there is a possibility the capacity of the tank has greatly reduced due to sediment. I had a 50-gal Richmond in the old house and it worked fine for shower. I have a jet tub in this house and a 50-gal is just not enough.
 
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Old 07-05-18, 11:52 PM
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A 50-gal heater can't supply two showers in a row? That is also ridiculous.
I've had 40 gallon hot water heaters in prior homes that supplied more than enough water for multipal showers.

If that isnt enouth water you need to alter your shower usage, Having that much hot water sitting unused is expensive.

Showering In an average home are typically the third largest water use after toilets and clothes washers. The average American shower uses 17.2 gallons (65.1 liters) and lasts for 8.2 minutes at average flow rate of 2.1 gallons per minute (gpm) (7.9 lpm).
 
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Old 07-06-18, 03:42 PM
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The height of your town house in stories has nothing to do with the amount of hot water you get from your existing hot water tank. I would recommend that you find out what is wrong with your existing tank. I would guess that there is a problem with the dip tube that is supposed to be installed on the cold supply. My son has a 40 gallon water heater and he has 2 sons (11 and 15) and they take very long showers and never run out of hot water. I need a 75 gallon tank only because I have a 2 person Jacuzzi. You need to find out what the problem is with your existing tank so you don't spend money needlessly.
 
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Old 07-12-18, 02:19 PM
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It turns out, there is a thermostat setting in my water heater which is hidden inside a metal cover. I have to unscrew the metal access panel and insulation to see it. The temperature is currently set to 1/3 of the way between Hot and Very Hot. According to the manual, Hot is 120F. So, that may explain why I'm running out of hot water at the end of a second shower. I don't want to try to turn the temperature up as my water heater is leaking very slowly. I still want to see if I can get a 75-gal as I'm almost done with my bathroom remodel with a jet tub (I think it is 75-gal tub). I don't think I will be able to haul it down to the basement even with help. HD online chat claims they can bring it down for me. I will go to the store to make sure it is true. If not, I will go with a 50-gal. Thanks!
 
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