More advice needed on new boiler installation

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Old 07-17-18, 04:40 PM
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More advice needed on new boiler installation

Hello All,

For those who have been following my previous post regarding "Advice needed on my 17-18 year old boiler", as you know I have found a solution which is a simple replacement of the exact same unit, thereby limiting plumbing modifications and more specifically reducing my cost by over 3k.

So here I sit with my new boiler and burner in bits in my Garage ready to be installed, the aforementioned install date to take place on July 31st.

I am now pondering the actual pluming/piping going to the boiler itself and need of additional advice or opinions with respect to the possible need of securing the pipes as the old is replaced with new.

To clarify my concern, from an installers standpoint, should one "brace" the pipes on the left and right side of the unit to alleviate undue stress on the plumbing itself as the boiler is being removed/installed ?

I would think that the weight of the pipes, zone valves, circ pump, expansion tank, and all the shutoff valves and other bits will add up to some weight when the math is done, and without the support of the furnace to keep everything in check, these pipes along with there items are going to create some stress upstream of the piping.

All comments and suggestions are more than welcome

Thanking everyone in advance!

-Jim
 
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Old 07-18-18, 03:40 AM
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Here is an approach that might be of interest.

To facilitate removal and servicing of circulator pump I have a small chain with turnbuckel anchored in ceiling beam. Bottom of chain is attached to pipe at top of pump.

Chain supports pipe assembly and pump. Turnbuckle can be used to create gap at pump flanges to change gaskets, etc.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 05:01 AM
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Could you post a better picture of the heating piping on the left side of the boiler. From the middle picture it looks like the heating piping is connected to the domestic coil.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 07:06 AM
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@Steamboy...

You are correct, the piping is connected to the domestic water heating coil. There is a brand new coil with this new furnace so these pipes will have to be re-attached/soldered.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 07:14 AM
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Will the domestic coil be isolated from the heating circuit which it should be. I would not want the heating water mixing with the domestic hot water. Is the way it is connected now the way it has been connected and used? Domestic water would accelerate the destruction of any steel and to some extent the cast iron boiler.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 08:14 AM
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Steamboy,

The way I understand the system, is that domestic water circulates inside the (enclosed) heating coil and that this circulated water is then heated by the water in the boiler. There is no transfer of water from the coil to the boiler as both the domestic and boiler water are isolated.

My issue with the flange leak is most likely a properly installed seal that allowed water to migrate and begin the rusting process outside of the flange. This water would have originated from the boiler itself.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 09:36 AM
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A better picture or 2 of the piping on the left side of the boiler is needed to rule out any cross connected piping between the heating and domestic. Looking at the pictures you supplied it looks as if there is a connection between the two systems.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 10:01 AM
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@Steamboy,

I can confirm without doubt that the hot water coil is 100 percent separate from the heating zones. Although you cannot see it in the pic, the "in" line from domestic is hidden behind a pipe and the other is visible heading up through the ceiling.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 10:57 AM
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From the middle picture it looks as if the domestic coil teed into the heating pipe but after careful study the fitting it thought was a tee is actually an elbow . (my mistake) It still seems to me to be a sin to get rid of a good heating boiler just due to a bad domestic coil boiler flange.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 11:07 AM
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@Steamboy..

I agree...however the flange is quite rusted around the bolts at the forward face of the join. That type of rust that flakes off if you touch it.

Making quite a mess on my floor as well.

I am going to keep all the bits attached to it and see if I can get something for the old burner.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 12:33 PM
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Maybe this is just a case of there having been a poor Gasket originally installed by the Manufacturer . . . . but replacing the whole Boiler in response to a poor Gasket seems to be a bit of an overkill !

Since it's the same Manufacturer and the same Model Boiler . . . . at least verify that the Gasket securing the Tankless Coil is of a higher quality than what they used the first time around.

I'm glad that you're able to retain the original plumbing work . . . . it looks to be of high quality and shows evidence of someone who took great pride in the appearance of their work !

Good Luck !
 
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Old 07-18-18, 01:29 PM
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well...if I was to be done properly, then the furnace would have to be removed to clean and dress the flange before a new piece could be welded on. We can debate this all day, but I have gone through the quotes and unless you are willing to hire underground work, most welders will not weld inside the house with an internal oil tank less than 6 feet away...not to mention the stress it would place on my home insurance policy if a fire ever broke out.

It can be done, , but you have to have the fire department basically waiting outside your door in the event something went south, along with special authorization from your insurance company, (which I was unable to get),

Therefore if this fix was to take place, the only viable option would be to remove the furnace from the site, repair it, , then reinstalled it at a cost significantly greater than a direct replacement.

Even after all of this, I would not be able to place insurance on the boiler itself due to the welded repair.

And yes....the flange will more than likely rust out again after 18 years, but will deal with that when the time comes.
 
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Old 07-18-18, 02:20 PM
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It's too late now . . . . but did anyone give you a quote for just replacing the Gasket and this Steel Plate?

 
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Old 07-18-18, 04:28 PM
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@Vermont

Yes. As I discussed in a previous post...the flange off the boiler is a one unit deal. You cannot replace the flange, only repair it.
 
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