Routing condensate, pressure relief and boiler drain water

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Old 08-05-18, 12:36 AM
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Routing condensate, pressure relief and boiler drain water

Hi everyone,

This looks like a pretty awesome site! Glad I found it

I'm installing a new Buderus boiler to replace an ancient Utica Boiler and had a question about draining to my sump pit the water generated by the condensate line, pressure relief valve and the boiler drain. Am I able to run all three sources to a say 1.5" PVC pipe that pitches back to my sump pit?

Also, I read the sticky saying not to flush your system. I'm not sure the existing system has ever been flushed. I know in the few times I've had to do parts replacement that the water was black and has sludge in it. I think the new system has aluminum components so is it a good idea to flush the old system before bringing the new one online? What about installing one of those sludge/dirt filters?

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 08-05-18, 06:25 AM
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The pressure relief valve discharge should piped by itself. Best to have it piped straight down to within a few inches above the basement floor and the floor sloped to a drain. PVC is not suitable because of the temperature.

The other sources can discharged however is most convenient.
 
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Old 08-05-18, 06:31 AM
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Re: flushing your new system. That will be fine. The main concern with routine flushing is that it brings air into the system which can lead to corrosion.

You can flush until the cows come home, and the black water will quickly return if you have any ferrous parts in your system. It is inevitable and harmless. I wouldn't recommend a filter, unless it is a sidestream.
 
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Old 08-05-18, 10:41 AM
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Thanks Mike!

So pipe the pressure relief valve as you would a hot water heater. It's an older basement and nothing pitches the right way. I'll have to see about cutting a trench toward the sump pit as it's only 3-4' away.

I see there's chemicals you can run through the system to assist with flushing. Should I do that?
 
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Old 08-05-18, 12:48 PM
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I wouldn't add chemicals, aluminum or not, unless to solve a specific problem. Don't overthink things.
 
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Old 08-06-18, 06:51 PM
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Flushing

Sorry but I tend to disagree with Mike! Thoroughly clean your system and treat it. It will make your new high efficiency boiler stay efficient. I use Fernox products. F3 Cleaner, F1 protector, and TF1 filter. If there are any ferrous metals in your system (and there usually are) the cleaner will help flush them out and the magnetic filter will collect the remnants and any future contaminants. This stuff works! If not Fernox there are other brands out there. Sentinal is another that comes to mind and Magnaclean filters are a good brand also.
 
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Old 08-06-18, 06:59 PM
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Condensate

I forgot to address the issues of routing your discharges. If at all possible leave a gap on your relief discharge before it drains into your sump, this way you can physically see if there is a discharge from the relief valve. As far as condensate, install a neutralizer because the condensate is acidic, the piping from the boiler condensate drain to the neutralizer must be plastic, PVC, vinyl hose...anyt any but metalic pipe and fittings. The acidic condensate will eat through the metal quite quickly. I've seen it go through copper inside a year.
 

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Old 08-23-18, 02:29 PM
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Thanks a lot for your feedback

I hadn't heard of that filter before so I'll check it out. I was looking at the BoilerMag filters. My piping to the radiators is 1.5" though so I'd have to get their commercial filter which is around $700 ouch!

Yes - I'm kind of concerned about the boiler having been installed for decades and water flowing through black pipe, copper, etc. It was already like sludge last time I had to replace a pump. So now I'll be introducing aluminum into the mix. So thanks for the chemical recommendations.
 
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