Help with Understanding my Boiler System

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Old 11-22-19, 07:26 PM
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Help with Understanding my Boiler System

Can someone please review these shots and tell me if I understand my system properly? One thing I've heard in a video was to never run cold water into a hot boiler. But isn't a boiler that auto-senses a drop in water pressure doing exactly that? I don't think my system has that type of detection though.

This is a shot of my boiler. It looks like the hot water supply for the 3 zones of my boiler system coming out of the boiler and going up through all 3 zones.

Picture #2:

Same 3 pipes (different view) supplying water directly out of the boiler system:



Picture #3:
The water supply line can be seen here. It appears to be manual fill only. There is no component in the water line to control the rate of fill that I can see. The fat horizontal pipe going back into the side of the boiler would be the single return water supply line. The upper blue value control would be used to shut off the return water supply line to the boiler. This would stop the return of water from all 3 of my zones at once, so no individual zone shutoff-values. The lower blue value appears to be for draining the entire system including the boiler.


Screenshot #4: (from above)
The black value on the left would be to turn on water supply line manually.
The red value on the right appears to be the idea place for me to hook up a hose and flush the air out of the system.


Screenshot #5:

A better angle of what appears to be the best place to flush air out of my system.
 

Last edited by 7heJ0ker; 11-22-19 at 07:38 PM. Reason: more information
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Old 11-22-19, 07:50 PM
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I'm not the boiler pro but I see some work done there that I've never seen before. Quite the creative piping job. I'm not big on that CPVC connection that close to the boiler.

I believe your your autofill is part of that gray expansion tank.
Something like this

A picture from further away from the boiler would be good too,
 
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Old 11-23-19, 08:21 AM
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Here's another screenshot showing all the pipes for all 3 zones where the water is returning and converging back into a single pipe to go back into the boiler. It looks to me like each zone could be individually shut off with the corresponding blue valve or all 3 at once with the lowest blue valve.

 
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Old 11-23-19, 09:19 AM
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Now I see multiple air vents but I'm not sure how helpful they'll be as they aren't installed in customary locations. The boiler crew will be by and add more info for you.
 
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Old 12-03-19, 11:49 AM
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Water Feedline Valve for Boiler System

I wonder if someone could explain to me how my water feed line valve for my boiler system works. I see there is a large blue steel knob which can be used to turn the water supply completely off and on. And then a small screw which appears to be nothing relevant at first glance. But I think it might be used to turn off/on the water supply also because the blue knob is already fully open and the PSI on my boiler system is only at about 10 psi.

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Is the screw acting as a second off/on function on a really small scale, for example, fine tuning the PSI in the boiler system?
 

Last edited by PJmax; 12-03-19 at 09:47 PM.
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Old 12-03-19, 06:11 PM
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Help me , before I Explode, please

How can I tell if my boiler system has a low water cutoff safety valve installed? Or would the boiler itself detect this condition and shut down?
 
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Old 12-03-19, 09:42 PM
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Don't explode. I combined all your individual threads. Keeping all your questions in one thread will allow the previous pictures posted to be used. There isn't a dedicated pro in this forum right now so the replies can be a little slow in coming. Feel free to bump the thread if no new replies are posted.

That looks like a basic CPVC shut off valve. That screw would be a way to drain the line out after shutting the valve off. That drain feature isn't really helpful in your application. It more for when the valve is used to shut off something like an outside faucet and you need to drain the line for the winter.

In some of your pictures I see steel metal clamps attached to the copper pipes to hold the wiring. That needs isolation between the steel and copper so as not to corrode the pipe. You can wrap the pipe with thin rubber or even a few wraps of duct tape. The type of connection can cause electrolysis which is bad for copper pipes.

I don't see a low water cutoff in your pictures. Most hydronic water boilers don't have one. Steam will always have one. Take several more pictures from further away so we can see all the piping and boiler at the same time. I'll resize them if too big.
 
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Old 12-03-19, 10:08 PM
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Sorry to say its time to say good by to that old baby. By the time you fix and spend money on new boiler piping repairs you may as well install a new boiler.

That looks like late 70's early 80's install work to me.

Get a competent plumber to do a proper heatloss calculation and size new boiler correctly.

3 zones and condensation issues possibly I would be looking at primary secondary pipeing or some type of boiler bypass.

What type of heat emmitters in the home? Radiators? Cast iron base board?

Dont waste your $$$ on that boiler.
 
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Old 12-04-19, 07:02 AM
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My system uses all baseboard heaters with aluminum fins inside I think. I may take your advice and just update the entire system but I may have to get through one last winter before doing so.

 
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Old 12-10-19, 08:40 PM
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I know that the power switch needs to be shut off on the boiler itself when bleeding air from the loops. But does the gas also need to be shut off, or can it be left on?

Also, I've been trying very hard to understand how the water pressure on my boiler system can be kept at "approximately" 12 psi even though the water pressure from the city is about 30 psi. I haven't seen an auto-fill valve anywhere on my water supply line. The only thing that might be keeping the pressure between the water supply line and the boiler system loops in harmony is this little piece of something I found:

 

Last edited by 7heJ0ker; 12-10-19 at 08:50 PM. Reason: added picture, spelling corrections
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