Need help removing Radiator Valve from Riser - It's stuck!

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  #1  
Old 06-09-20, 12:18 PM
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Question Need help removing Radiator Valve from Riser - It's stuck!

I am not Mr. Golden hands, but I need to replace a leaking radiator valve for my steam-based heating system.

I was able to remove the baseboard from the radiator valve (using Slant/Fin MultiPak 80), but I am having a problem removing the bottom of the radiator valve from the riser. I am using 2 large plumbing wrenches but I just can't get it to move so I can unscrew it. Attached below are two photos. On one of them, I have drawn up numbers so you or I can reference with comments.

What I have done is just put some WD-40 in between Nos. 2 & 3, as that's where I assume the thread is stuck. Or am I wrong? I have been clamping the bottom wrench on No. 1 and trying to turn (counter-clock-wise) the brass-colored part of the valve by griping with the top wrench at Nos. 3 or 4.

I assume No. 2 is part of the riser and should stay on it? Or am I mistaken?

Does anyone have any other suggestions besides me applying the WD-40 for overnight, to see if it somehow loosens this up?

Thank you all for any and all input.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-09-20, 02:21 PM
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No, Part #2 is a bushing the adapts (reduces) your valve's inlet that is larger than the riser pipe. If you are going to replace the valve, you can also replace the bushing. What size wrenches are you using?
 
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Old 06-09-20, 02:58 PM
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You unscrew #3from #2 using the flats on the hexes (righty tighty /lefty loosey). #3 and #4 are the same part. I would replace with same size valve (reusing retaining bushing #2) unless the new valve changes the centerline of the valves connection to the radiator.
 
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Old 06-09-20, 04:47 PM
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I am using 18 inch size Ridgid Heavy Duty Pipe Wrench
 
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Old 06-09-20, 04:50 PM
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Thanks for the reply and clarification. Just want to make sure that: I am going COUNTER CLOCK WISE (left to right) when I try to unscrew #3), while keeping #2 steady or push in the opposite direction of #3.

Do you think the WD40 will "loosen" anything after an overnight wait? I put it all around in between #2 and #3

 
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Old 06-09-20, 06:22 PM
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For serious DIY plumbing, you need two 24" pipe wrenches. Sometime, you can get by bracing the handle of one smaller wrench against a wall. I don't recommend using a cheater - it can can be dangerous. Good luck.









for
 
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Old 06-10-20, 06:52 AM
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Where is the valve leaking? If around the stem, this is often repairable without replacing the valve.
 
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Old 06-10-20, 06:54 AM
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Pipe threads make an interference fit in a joint - WD-40 won't seep into the joint. You might try heating the female part of the joint before torqueing with two wrenches. But, a pair of 24" pipe wrenches would be the cat's meow. Your 18" wrenches would be OK for Samson.
 
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Old 06-14-20, 09:39 AM
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That valve looks pretty new so I have to ask where the leak is? (picture of that area if different from the existing picture). If the leak is at the union nut area, was the old fitting used?

You could try to tighten the valve first, just a little to break the thread hold then try to remove the valve. If you can move the thread just a fraction, then the valve can be removed easier. To use heat, heat the brass valve just above the # 3. WD 40 will not help you since it is only a lubricant and not a penetrating product. Using a pipe wtench on that brass valve may just be causing the brass to distort squeezing the threads tighter.
 
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Old 06-18-20, 03:35 AM
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Just wanted to let you and any others that may come across this subject that until I had a friend who came over with a blow-torch to heat the pipes, there was just no way to separate (remove) the valve. Once the blow-torch was used, it came off like butter.

Thank you all again for all the help.
 
  #11  
Old 06-18-20, 12:29 PM
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Some thread sealant (pipe dope) gets hard as rock & there's no getting it apart without heat. When my dad's boiler was installed in 1954 the plumber used white lead paint as thread sealant. Heat was the only way to get pipes apart.
 
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Old 06-23-20, 08:45 AM
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Many years back I watched plumber in my 60 year old NYC office building removing a steam radiator valve.

For 15 minutes or more he sat on floor gently tapping a Stillson pipe wrench with hammer. I thought he was wasting his time but was surprised when it ultimately loosened.

No strong arm stuff, just patience tapping.
 

Last edited by doughess; 06-23-20 at 09:00 AM.
  #13  
Old 06-24-20, 09:54 PM
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M,
The gap had nothing to do with the baseboard giving off more heat. You may have had more element in that room. As far as the quarter round molding at the top my guess is that they did not remove the wood baseboards before they attached the heating casing to the wall. Some contractors do not remove the baseboard but just leave in there and attach the covers to the wood and then cover the gap with the molding to cover the space. Most contractors will remove the baseboard and attach the covers right to the wall.

They are usually screwed to the wall studs and not glued. They may have glued them because of the tile and didn't know how to find the studs through the tile wall which is why he didn't remove the wood baseboards in the other rooms. It was just easier for him to screw the casing to the wood already there.

Depend how your system is piped if some rooms are cooler you may need more element. Just because you have baseboard covers it doesn't mean there is heating element there. It may be just copper pipe to connect to the next piece. Take a look inside the covers and make sure you actually have element and not just pipe that has no heat value.

Hope this helps a little.


Hope this hepls a little.
 
  #14  
Old 06-25-20, 10:27 AM
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Where is point of leak on this valve?? Seat, stem, NPT pipe threads or coupling???
 
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