Furnace age and name

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  #1  
Old 09-24-20, 02:50 PM
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Furnace age and name

Age and name of furnace. I need a new fire box. What size?



 
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Last edited by PJmax; 09-24-20 at 05:22 PM. Reason: reoriented/enlarged picture
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Old 09-24-20, 05:25 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

I moved your thread to the boiler forum. A furnace is hot air. A boiler is hot water.

A new firebox ?
It may be more cost effective to replace the boiler.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 07:18 PM
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Thank you. Iím new at this and was hoping it could be replaced.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 08:16 PM
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Give us a little more information.
The firebox is inside where the burner is. Is the interior all rusted or rotted out ?
That really wouldn't be a DIY job. Was it recommended by a service person ?
 
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Old 09-25-20, 12:29 PM
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They can be replaced once you know what your boiler is. Below is a catalogue by Lynn who makes replacement chambers. This will show you what is available.

You can remove that large iron plate on your boiler to give you access to the inside and measure your current chamber if all else fails. It could be dirty but with any mechanical ability and common sense is doable.

https://www.lynnmfg.com/ Click on combustion chamber kits to see what's available for your boiler.

Hope this helps a little.
 
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Old 09-25-20, 06:21 PM
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The inside isnít rusted out. The fire box is crumbled and mostly turned to dust. Probably needs an adjustment. I have no additional info on the boiler. No name tag is visible. Iím also very concerned that the bolts will snap off and I will need to drill and tap them. I am mechanical, work on antique air cooled VW buses and bugs so I have drilled and tapped many broken bolts. Problem I have is, what size do I buy? What do I have to measure? Do I have to remove the front plate to measure or can I measure the outside and minus the wall thickness? Everything but the fire box is in good shape. Old but working well.

thanks for reading.
 
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Old 09-26-20, 06:51 AM
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I’m concerned with the signs of combustion products on the front of the boiler. When was the last time the boiler was cleaned? And was tested via combustion analysis equipment?
 
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Old 09-26-20, 10:20 AM
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M,
It is just a guess but it might be an old American Standard. If no other info can be found how do they know what nozzle to use. The nozzle goes by the BTU's and the width of the chamber. Your chamber is only there to contain the fire and should never be touched by the fire itself.

You will have to remove the front plate to get the dimensions of the new chamber and yes there is always the possibility of snapping bolts.

If you look at the LYNN sight you will see Wet Blanket material and you can make your own. You can buy in a roll and cut it to size to line your boiler and when it is heated it will make your firebox. You can call LYNN and they could possibly help you out also. If you sent them a pic they might even be able to identify the boiler.

One of the first things I would do is see what nozzle you have. That will tell you the gpm and the angle of the spray you are firing. You want to make sure the chamber is wide enough to accept the fuel you are feeding in.

This is for info purposes only. You have a cast iron boiler completely surrounded by water so there is no danger of burning out the cast iron sections so a firebox is not a dealbreaker if you don't have one, unlike a steel boiler that must have one since it is a dry based boiler and will burn through the steel. The water in the cast iron boiler keeps the sections from cracking. The chamber is there for noise reduction and efficiency. The new boilers today mostly have just target walls against the back of the boiler so you do have options.

Hope this helps a little.
 
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