Boiler Buderus G115ws

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Old 10-19-20, 04:17 PM
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Boiler Buderus G115ws

I am looking at the manuel that says to put the baffles in the horizontal position. There is a diagram that shows the ends of the baffles, but I don't know which way is horizontal. The baffles are triangular.

Anyone know ?

Thanks

 
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Old 10-19-20, 06:40 PM
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Diagram from manuel

 

Last edited by PJmax; 10-19-20 at 07:40 PM. Reason: resized pic
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Old 10-19-20, 07:42 PM
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I was looking at the same diagram.
It looks like they are illustrating the final position that the baffles should be in.
 
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Old 10-19-20, 08:10 PM
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I think your right, a later diagram explains to turn them to a slant to increase stack temp.

When I open the door I can pull them out and see.

Thanks !
 
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Old 11-05-20, 05:27 PM
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So the service guy came to set my boiler too specs. The stack temperature he measured was 260. The book says spec is 326. He seemed unconcerned with the lower temperature. I suggested adjusting baffles as per the book, but he thought uneccesary. Saying it was above the temperature that condensation would occur,,and it might "screw something else up".

He was new to both Buderus oil boiler and Riello burners. He is the oil burner guy for the company he works for.

Should I pull a pair of baffles to increase stack temp by 40, as per the book, or is this not recommended?
 
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Old 11-06-20, 12:07 PM
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84,
From personal experiences my suggestion, especially with Riello would be to follow their recommendations and get someone who is familiar with working on Riello's. They are not like Beckett or Carlin burners. They must be set up to their specs. At the very least if you are unsure I would call Rielolo and see what they recommend.

This is just my opinion but when I was doing service I can't tell you the number of problems I solved just by setting up the burners the proper way after a tech had just did what he would do on a normal burner which went from wrong nozzle to the wrong pump pressure and baffeling.

In my area and I'm sure others they recommeneded and held classes to work on these burners. It wasn't mandatory but it was highly recommended with a certificate given on completion in case of problems.

Hope this helps a little.
 
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Old 11-07-20, 12:56 AM
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Spott, thanks for the feed back !
I live near Pittsburgh, have not found anyone that knows Reillo yet. They are uncommon in this area. The other specs including pump pressure were set to the book numbers.

So I ran an experiment after the tech left.
The hydrostat is a Fuel Smart 3250plus and on a new heat call, it will fire and heat water up to 150 then shutoff before thermostat satisfied, a few minutes later, refire and heat up to 165 shutoff, and keep repeating this cycle, each time water temp climbing higher toward max temperature until thermostat satisfied.

I watched the stack temperature during this whole cycle process and it too would rise to an increasingly higher temp. during each cycle, (stack temperature falling back when flame
out) maxing out at 290. (30 higher than the 260 the tech measured). This is part of the Fuel Smart efficiency scheme, not heating to max water temperature initially, until the unit samples how often heat calls are made in response to flame on heat cycles.

My point is two things, first, given more time than the tech gave it, the stack temperature rose to 290
which is a lot closer to the spec of 326 than the 260 he measured. Second, this hydrostat seems as if it is designed to maintain water temperature and stack temperature below max values a lot of the time for fuel efficiency. This puts me back to wondering about low stack temperature condensation. Any thoughts ?


 
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Old 11-07-20, 02:03 PM
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84,
Listed below is a sight where you can scroll to install instructions and it will tell you everything you need to know about your control depending what you have for a system, meaning zones and hot water. Condensation happens around 125 which your control prevents I believe.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Hydrolev...hoClt0QAvD_BwE

Hope this helps a little.
 
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Old 11-08-20, 08:57 AM
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Condensation is a 133 F and leads to sulfuric acid and boiler deterioration, so should be avoided.

84EdH stack temperature is way higher than 133 F.

Stack temperatures below 300 F reflect high efficiency, 85% or more.

Consider manufacturer's spec to be limits, not goals.
 

Last edited by doughess; 11-08-20 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 11-09-20, 05:10 PM
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It makes sense to see the spec of 326 as a limit, not a goal. However. The manuel goes through some detail showing how to raise stack temp by adjusting or removing baffles.
 
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Old 11-10-20, 09:07 AM
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Adjusting baffles is about optimizing boiler heat transfer efficiency.

Combustion efficiency is a different issue.

Both use stack temperatures for reference.

Heating cost rise with higher stack temperatures.
 

Last edited by doughess; 11-10-20 at 09:23 AM.
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Old 11-11-20, 04:10 PM
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So, as long as I am not getting condensation in the chimney, lower temps are better (assuming combustion side of things is happy).

Where and how do I check for effects of condensation if I had it ?
 
 

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