Adjusting radiator

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  #1  
Old 11-01-20, 12:10 PM
R
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Adjusting radiator

I know this answer must be here, but searching didn't turn up what I have, sorry if this is a repeat.

I'm looking to turn off this convector radiator.
Details:
- House is 1952, this is original. This room has two other electric-hydronic bsbrds to regulate heating.
- This is on a loop with other rooms. Can I turn this radiator off (bypassing) while keeping the others active in the loop?
- Is there a likelihood of the adjustment screw being "frozen" and creating damage?
- Do I use screw #1? Screw #2? Both?
- If I use only one to complete this, what does the other screw do?

Thanks for your time.




 
  #2  
Old 11-01-20, 12:32 PM
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#1 is for bleeding air. Whether #2 could affect other rads depends on how they are piped. If you can view the piping from the basement, you should be able to tell. Or just try it - #2 looks to be wide open now.
 
  #3  
Old 11-02-20, 07:13 AM
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Slot on #2 is now vertical for open. Turn #2 horizontal to close. There still may be some flow but far less heat from unit.
 
  #4  
Old 11-02-20, 12:36 PM
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As gil said in previous post it all depends how system is piped if you can close #2. If you have a series circuit and you shut off #2 you will be shutting off the heat to everything beyond that point. If you have a monoflo system which is why gil asked you to check your piping then shutting off #2 will not effect the rest of the system.

What you want to look for is your tee fittings in the basement where the pipe goes to the unit and see if there are any markings on one of the tees like an arrow. If so you can turn the convector, which is the right term for what you have, off and not effect the rest of the system. If the pipe goes from convector to convector and not connected to the main line you cannot shut #2 off without killing the heat to everything beyond that point.

If confused about what to look for pics of the piping would be helpful, especially the tee fittings.

This is only my opinion but I would take gil's advice before touching anything.

Hope this helps a little.
 
  #5  
Old 11-02-20, 01:17 PM
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If each of Rinrin's radiators has shut off valve, then his system is probably piped so that any one can be closed without effecting the others.

In 1952 many systems fed elements thru butterfly shut offs with divert tee's. All of my original 1957 elements have valves. Shutting off one does not effect others.

If rinrin shuts it off and others continue to heat problem is solved
 
  #6  
Old 11-02-20, 02:02 PM
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doughess,
You are partially right. In the 50's they did use these butterfly valves on convectors and mostly because monoflo systems were the choice of piping back then but as you said PROBABLY and that is the key word. That butterfly valve looks very old and playing with that valve may cause a leak that could only be fixed by changing it which would require draining the whole system which as you may know is a complete pain with a monoflo.

What I am more interested in is the other valve under the convector to see if that has a shutoff also. That valve marked #1 is of no use at all as far as isolating the unit. It is only the bleeder. If all his units have bleeders like that and he drains the system to replace that el he will have to pull all the covers off and bleed each one individually which would be a nuisance.

As gil said, check your piping first before creating troubles you don't need.
 
  #7  
Old 11-03-20, 06:27 AM
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Thanks for the thoughts gentlemen.

So I neglected to say ... this is a second floor unit, no access directly under the floor for a possible valve.

Would there be a chance they would put a valve all the way down the line in the basement for this leg? I have a sheetrock ceiling (in basement) where it goes up in the walls, so before I go poking holes, just curious if that's a likelihood or not. If not, might be stuck with trying "Screw #2" as a hopeful isolated shut-off?

I definitely do need to keep the rest of the run working for other rooms if it's a monoflo as been mentioned.
 
  #8  
Old 11-03-20, 01:12 PM
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R,
If it's a monoflo your line will go all the way to the main line in the basement. Just look at your main line surrounding the basement and look at the Tee fitittin a 2 pipe gs to each line. If it's a monoflo there will be an arrow on one of the tee's and both the supply and return will go into the same main line.

You may also have a 2 pipe system where your supply goes up from one line and your return comes back to another line in the basement. No matter what you have it would all start in the basement.

Hope this helps a little.
 
  #9  
Old 11-03-20, 07:04 PM
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The quick, simplest thing is to shut off that valve by turning slot from vertical to horizontal.

Then raise thermostat temperature and see if other elements get hot.

If others heat then rinrin's problem is solved.

If all elements failed to get hot then they are in series loop
 

Last edited by doughess; 11-03-20 at 08:12 PM.
  #10  
Old 11-04-20, 06:00 AM
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If worse comes to worst you can cover any hydronic or steam radiator with blankets and much less heat will be emitted into the room. Most of the heat energy will end up in other rooms or the boiler won't run as much.

The blankets or batt insulation or insulation boards should go around the back of the radiator as much as possible too. Minimize any unusual or additional crushing of batt insulation.
 
 

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