turned off water. boiler valve leaking


  #1  
Old 09-24-22, 03:53 PM
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turned off water. boiler valve leaking

replaced this valve 2 years ago per this thread
what is this and why leaking

went away this week and my mom checked the house 4 days after i left and said the boiler had a puddle of water on it and it was dripping regularly. but not a stream. i said just put some towels on top of it as i always kill the water main and flip the emergency switch before leaving on vacation.

but why again do i need a valve again so soon? and why does it ONLY leak when the main water is turned off. I do i regularly turn off the water for a few minutes to fill unsoftened water container once a week. bu tthat shouldnt matter regarding this valve should it?

i turned on the boiler and the heat today when i got back home and it doesnt leak anymore. also when i turned on the water main there was a very long whoosh sound meaning it was filling the boiler again i presume? wasnt a toilet leak. i always check them before i turn on the water (had issues before)

during summer vacations i can kill the boiler but during winter i have to keep the boiler on (i cannot flip the 2 valves on either side of the checkvalve to prevent water from going on the boiler). boiler is away from the walls and any drain so running a pipe to drain is not really an option. nor should it be leaking this bad




 
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Old 09-24-22, 04:22 PM
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That is a backflow preventer. It relies on water pressure to operate and seal.
If you turn the water off.... eventually as the system pressure goes down... it will open and start pissing. Nothing wrong with the valve.
 
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  #3  
Old 09-24-22, 04:43 PM
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interesting. so any idea why for 2 years it didnt leak. ive had multiple vacations since then

but good to know theres no issue. i guess ill have to rig up a pipe drain of some sort. cant have this happening every trip i take
 
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Old 09-25-22, 07:05 AM
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checked this morning. had paper towel down. no leak. but why since 2009 have i never had this issue before. ive turned off the water tons of times. very strange. i just worry when i go away and kill the water that it will leak on the time delay box attached to the side of the boiler.

i wonder if it has anything to do with me getting 2 new baseboards installed during a bathroom renovation?
 
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Old 09-25-22, 07:39 AM
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leak on the time delay
If you install the pipe drop that is required (as Gilmorrie said in Post# 4 in your original thread) the water will go to the floor. If you do not want water running across the floor to the drain you can put a bucket below the pipe to contain an occasional discharge.

Installing baseboards may have introduced air into the system and that may affect the pressure. Normally the back flow preventer wouldn't react to that but turning off the water supply may eliminate pressure on the supply side and air being removed automatically on the boiler side may be causing minor pressure fluctuations that trigger the valve.
 
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Old 09-25-22, 07:59 AM
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is turning off the boiler during vacations a bad idea? would that keep the pressure up.
 
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Old 09-25-22, 08:26 AM
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Most boilers have an automatic fill valve to maintain the pressure and should have a shutoff valve ahead of it. There is an ongoing debate about whether to keep the shutoff valve open or closed. In normal operation a hydronic system should not lose water and pressure is maintained without having to introduce more. In that case once a system is at the desired pressure automatic fill is not required and the shutoff valve can be left closed. However if the system loses water and/or pressure there is no make up until the shutoff valve is opened. Others will argue that the shutoff valve should just be left open, but that allows the possibility of flooding if aboiler or system rupture occurs.

Shutting off the water supply to the boiler (all the time or just on vacation) will isolate it from your main system and pressure differences will not be seen by the back flow preventer. If you leave the valve off all the time you will need to monitor the pressure to make sure there is sufficient water in the system.
 
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Old 09-25-22, 10:56 AM
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Turning the water off in the house is a good idea when on vacation.
The water heater and boiler need to be off.
Put a bucket under the valve when you shut the water off.
 
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Old 10-05-22, 03:49 AM
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i happened to be in the room today when the boiler was doing it's morning warm up of the house. the darn thing was dripping even during a run cycle. this is not normal is it?
 
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Old 10-05-22, 06:04 AM
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Normal.
 
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Old 10-05-22, 06:09 AM
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then all these years it was ABnormal because except for the previous post it never leaked . i guess i was lucky for a decade. or maybe this new valve is crap
 
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Old 10-05-22, 04:54 PM
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LD,
That Backflow Preventer should only drip on a pressure difference to stop boiler water syphoning back into your potable water and should have nothing to do with the boiler running or not.

I noticed a ball valve between your feed valve and your boiler. Shut that valve off to isolate your boiler from your potable water so nothing can drain back for lack of a better term and see what happens.

If the BF still drips it has nothing to do with the boiler and you can search elsewhere for the problem.
 
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Old 10-06-22, 12:04 PM
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thats what worries me. that something is dropping water pressure. still wondering if it's linked to the new baseboards installed during summer . he bled them while he was here but obviously i didnt have the heat running in july to bleed everything.

and what if there is low pressure in the boiler system and i turn this off, wouldnt that be an issue for my heating system now that its on. if something truly is dropping the pressure dont wanna hurt anything by turning the valve off
 
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Old 10-06-22, 05:47 PM
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LD,
That BF works on PRESSURE DIFFERENCE. In order for that to leak your BOILER PRESSURE would have to be GREATER than your HOUSE PRESSURE. If your boiler pressure gets low then your BOILER PRV { auto feed valve} automatically lets water in to the set pressure amount.

Fill your boiler to 20 psi and shut the manual valve off and keep an eye on it for awhile. You have a closed loop system and without a leak or any bleeding there is no place for the water to go.

Your house pressure will never go below your boiler pressure unless you turn off the main to the house or if you have well water and you have pump trouble.
 
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Old 10-06-22, 06:52 PM
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so when someone flushed the toilet. the thing leaked. the house pressure went down to 60 then up to 80 when the toilet was off. strangely enough when the washer filled, pressure went down to 40 but the valve wasnt leaking.

just checked and boiler was at 20 psi and hasnt run pretty much all day. is stone cold.

your statement that it wont leak unless the boiler pressure is greater than house pressure doesnt seem to apply to my situation here. so could it be a bad valve?

regarding the valve that i'm supposed to shut off, is it the valve with the yellow handle or the other 'inline one' to the right in the picture. that one leads to the cold water house supply. the yellow one goes to the boiler

also what is the blue thing between the yellow valve and my leaking valve?

and is there any chance if i shut off the valve you are recommending, that the boiler pressure could run low if there is a leak somewhere? im not home all the time to monitor it.

...as an aside, my water meter was replaced today. the remote reading battery died. so maybe this is complicating issues. but i still had leaks before.

still trying to wrap my head around why no leaks for 10 years now all this. trying to think what changed.
 
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Old 10-06-22, 07:39 PM
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1} Yellow handle valve going to boiler is the one to close.

2} By the BF leaking with a change in house pressure proves it's not boiler oriented.

3} If you do shut the yellow valve off and you do have a leak in the heating in the future then the boiler pressure will go down which is why you must check it periodically.

4} Why would you get a 20 psi difference for 1 fixture and a 40 psi drop for another. What happens when you run your tub. That is your biggest draw. It sounds like you are having an issue with your domestic pipes. What I would do is have someone downstairs checking the pressure and the valve and check each fixture separately and log results. It does look like a domestic problem

 
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Old 10-07-22, 05:00 AM
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if i dont check boiler pressure regularly after the valve is closed, what happens ?

regardless of the other issues, you said the thing wont leak unless the home pressure is less than the 20 on the boiler and even with my issues it isnt ever under 20 that the boiler is set at. if thats true, then wouldnt that indicate a bad valve? with all ive seen , house pressure never goes under 40 yet i've see it drip at 40. heck ive seen it drip when house pressure is 80. but less likely i admit. so it it drips at house pressure of 80 then whats the issue?

my guess is a toilet uses less pressure because of constriction of the flow mechanism. but thats just a guess.

also i have no downstairs lol. everything is in the utility room next to my kitchen. thats why it's so ez to check.. im in there doing whatever and just happen to see the psi on the main line when something else happens. i dont go in there looking for leaks. thats the thing. if it's leaking just when i 'happen' to be in there who knows what happens when im not watching. maybe i need to hook up a cam!
 
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Old 10-07-22, 01:01 PM
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if i don't check boiler pressure regularly after the valve is closed, what happens ?

Nothing happens as long as there are no boiler leaks. Once you are satisfied it is not the boiler causing your problem you can leve it any way that makes you comfortable.

As far what is causing the BF to leak, I don't have an answer for that. Possible bad valve but only a guess.

 
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Old 10-07-22, 01:53 PM
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if boiler leaks and i dont catch that. by not checking. any damage to anything?
 
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Old 10-07-22, 04:26 PM
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Could you please be more specific.
 
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Old 10-07-22, 06:12 PM
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if i go away a week on vacation with that valve off. whats the worst that could happen
 
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Old 10-08-22, 10:33 AM
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LD,
My only suggestion is that you take the boiler with you so you can enjoy your vacation and not drive yourself crazy with worry or buy a huge bottle of aspirin for the headache you will develop. lol.

These are your two scenarios: You leave the valve on and if you get a leak you have a flood.
2) You shut the valve off and you have a leak. NO FLOOD but possible cracked boiler.
Solution: Leave valve off and install a LOW WATER CUTOFF so in the event of a leak your boiler will shut down without damage or flood..
By the time you decide it will probably be spring anyway. Have a good weekend!!!
 
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Old 10-08-22, 10:36 AM
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boiler runs year round
 
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Old 10-08-22, 10:45 AM
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Thumbs up

The final decision will have to be yours given your options.

 
 

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