Footing & foundation for new room addition

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  #1  
Old 08-29-02, 05:41 AM
yonah
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Footing & foundation for new room addition

I'm trying to do most of the work on my room addition myself. I have good carpentry skills, but lack experience in building footings and foundations. Room size is 16x18. Builders around here (south-central MO) tell me that 18 inches is deep enough to go for footings. I'm a little skeptical of this figure, unless a shallow insulated footing is built. I need information on insulated footings, and also instruction on building the forms for the footing and foundation. This room will have a craw space with wood floor. The old original house is built on a mortared stone foundation, which I suspect was laid on top of the ground, and therefore subject to frost heave in the winter. Will I have problems if the old foundation heaves and the new one doesn't?
The new roof will attach to the walls of the old house, underneath the eaves of the old house. Any help, comments appreciated.
yonah
 
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  #2  
Old 08-31-02, 07:10 PM
Tn...Andy
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IF you don't think 18" is deep enough, why not just go a little deeper rather than trying to insulate ??

As to the footings, I just have a backhoe dig the footers and pour directly in that trench. We lay cinder block on that for our foundation. If you're going to pour walls for yours, you'll need to leave rebar sticking out to tie it to the footers and build plywood forms.

Will you have problems with the old and new ? If one heaves and the other doesn't, yep.....I'd say you're gonna spend a lot of springs patching sheetrock

Lot of times adding on to an old house is not worth the time and effort if you ask me. You'd be better off to build new, live in the old until you're done and tear it down. People say "They don't build 'em like the used to" and I usually mutter "thank God'
 
  #3  
Old 09-01-02, 11:12 AM
yonah
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Thanks for your comments and suggestions! Think I'll go 24 inches deep instead of 18 for the footing. Have you ever used dry stack cinder block for a foundation wall, using fiberglass reinforced bonding cement such as Q-Bond , Sureway or Quikwall? The manufacturers claims for these products look enticing to a do-it-yourselfer, and would allow me to build the wall without the need of a cement mason. An idea occurred to me to help prevent the old house foundation from heaving in the winter - dig down around the perimeter and install rigid insulation, backfilled with dirt and then covered with a 4 to 6 inch layer of mulch. (The perimeter is mostly surrounded with flower beds, so the mulch would be good for the beds anyway). What do you think?
P.S. Your suggestion of building a complete new house is valid, but unfortunately not an option for me for financial reasons.
Yonah
 
  #4  
Old 09-01-02, 02:01 PM
yonah
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Thanks for your comments and suggestions! Think I'll go 24 inches deep instead of 18 for the footing. Have you ever used dry stack cinder block for a foundation wall, using fiberglass reinforced bonding cement such as Q-Bond , Sureway or Quikwall? The manufacturers claims for these products look enticing to a do-it-yourselfer, and would allow me to build the wall without the need of a cement mason. An idea occurred to me to help prevent the old house foundation from heaving in the winter - dig down around the perimeter and install rigid insulation, backfilled with dirt and then covered with a 4 to 6 inch layer of mulch. (The perimeter is mostly surrounded with flower beds, so the mulch would be good for the beds anyway). What do you think?
P.S. Your suggestion of building a complete new house is valid, but unfortunately not an option for me for financial reasons.
Yonah
 
  #5  
Old 09-01-02, 11:48 PM
josh1
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NB .. concretes not my thing.. too heavy.. but if you do want poured walls on top of the footing you can do as suggested and use rebar or you can lay a 2x4 "key" into the wet footings so when the walls are poured its all interlocked. Very solid in my mind.

Hope this helps-Josh
 
  #6  
Old 09-02-02, 05:25 PM
Tn...Andy
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Yonah:

I've never used the side mortar on block, always laid them the conventional way. I'm sure the side bonding stuff would be a lot stronger on side strength, the only problem I see is getting the block level. Blocks are fairly uniform, but if you go several courses, or your footer is the least bit off, I think the top won't be level or straight. I know they supply plastic shims, but still looks like a pill to keep straight. Ain't that hard to lay them conventionally.....then if you need more side strength, plaster 'em up with the stuff.
 
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