Concrete slab quote


  #1  
Old 05-19-03, 10:42 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Concrete slab quote

Specs:

Rural SE Minnesota

4" 24x29 slab within an insulated existing Morton pole building.

4" with 8" thick perimeter edge 18x19 apron in front of double 8' garage doors.

1/2" re-rod on 2' centers throughout, placed on 1/2" PEX.

Base is compacted sand in building (already placed) requires minimal (1"-2")additional build up with compacted crushed rock to reach level. Perimeter already insulated 18" - 24" vertically with 2" rigid foam. Topsoil was removed before sand was placed, sand sat 3 1/2 months before building was erected.

Apron to be poured on compacted crushed rock, requiring additional build-up (0 - 8") and compaction with crushed rock to reach level.

Supply and place treated 2x8 (fastened to columns 7'9" OC) around inside perimeter of pole building to act as form and left in place (extending up from slab 3 1/2") as bottom support for interior paneling. One 29' side already in place.

Place 6mil vapor barrier and 2" rigid insulation (owner supplied) on base within building.

Staple 1/2" PEX (three 250' loops owner supplied) to insulation, connected to contractor-supplied manifold and pressurized through out pour, install slab temperature sensor.

Supply, pour, and finish concrete within building and apron.

$3500 for labor, re-rod, forms, and concrete (17 yards?) sound about right? This is a ball-park quote verbally supplied Saturday, written quote requested today.

Anything I've left out? I think you guys will enjoy this one. Thanks in advance for whatever time you devote to replies.
 
  #2  
Old 05-20-03, 04:41 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 989
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
I live in the Twin Cities and that sure looks like a reasonable price to me at about $5 per square foot, especially given the #4 @ 24" each way. Only way to really know for sure is to get a couple more prices. I suspect prices around here are going to be higher than where you are.

BTW, I would be sure they support the steel on chairs rather than lifting it as they pour the concrete so you can be sure the steel is where you want it. Can't tell you how many times I've seen the contractor lift mesh, then walk over it a few minutes later.

Bruce
 
  #3  
Old 05-20-03, 07:29 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the response...it's actually ~ $3.50 a square foot with both the floor and the apron included. Floor 24x29= 690 sq feet;
apron 18x19=342. 342+690= 1032. I'm starting to wonder if it's too low.
 
  #4  
Old 05-20-03, 10:10 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 989
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Oops, forgot about your apron. That's really a good price, for around here at least. I would expect to pay about that much for a straight, un-reinforced slab.

Too low? Hard to say without a couple other prices. Work is starting to get so scarce around here that I'm starting to hear about contractors taking jobs at cost to keep their people busy. Keep in mind, too, that labor rates in rural MN are usually lower than here in the Cities.

Have you checked this contractor out?

Bruce
 
  #5  
Old 05-20-03, 11:05 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yes...he's a friend of a friend, and recently poured one just like this in his own shop...I'll stop buy and have a look before I put any money down.

I'm getting advice as well indicating I should specify 3000 psi mix and curing compound...don't know much about curing compound...what have you heard?
 
  #6  
Old 05-21-03, 04:15 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 989
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
I assume this is a heated building? Given the garage doors, you will be storing vehicles in the building?

If it were me, I would use 4000 psi concrete; a lot more durable and not much more cost. I certainly wouldn't use 3000 psi concrete for a slab; maybe 3500 if you twisted my arm really hard. You definately want 4000 psi for the apron.

My real dilemma is the apron. The apron concrete should really have an air entraining admixture to make it more resistant to salt and freeze/thaw, but the heated building doesn't need this. Ask the contractor if he can do the apron in one load (I'm guessing this is about 5 CY) with 4000 psi, air entrained and the rest with just 4000 psi concrete.

As far as curing compounds, that's a very common thing and is used in place of covering the whole works with poly or burlap. Basically it keeps the water in the concrete from drying out too quickly, which weakens the concrete.

Hope this helps.

Bruce
 
  #7  
Old 05-21-03, 05:17 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hey, thanks alot for your help. 4000# it is. Won't use salt on the apron. Curing compound for sure.
 
  #8  
Old 05-21-03, 06:04 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 989
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
I guess I was thinking more about road salt; melts off the car and sits on the apron. If cost is prohibitive for you, straight 4000 psi mix will still give you a good slab. Also, ask for a 4" slump and see if you can convince the contractor not to add water at the site. That will also help durability.

Bruce
 
  #9  
Old 05-21-03, 04:18 PM
Tn...Andy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
We always use a pour on sealer right after the slab is cured enough to walk on.....same day or early the next. Spray with a deck sprayer or paint roller it on. Like burlap, keeps it from drying too fast, and keeps the concrete a lot more dust free later in an unfinished shop. I'd go 2 coats on a shop floor.

The difference in 3500 and 4000 here is only $2/yd.....$34 is nothing on a project like this.
 
  #10  
Old 05-21-03, 08:33 PM
awesomedell's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 2,351
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I agree with Andy, using a sealer is alot less labor intensive than covering up a pour.
My concrete sub typically has 1 guy do this while the rest of the crew heads to the next job & he runs back by the next morning for a second coat. He's done a bunch of free standing garages & pole barns for me like this & always with excellent results, well no complaints, which translates to me as excelent results.
I'm in rural MO, the price seems a tad low to me, usual cost runs about $4 s/f around here, can be higher depending on distance & property conditions.
 
  #11  
Old 05-22-03, 05:32 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks...this thing is shaping up. Sounds like putting the sealer on is something I can do myself. Any particular brand names that you would recommend?
 
  #12  
Old 05-22-03, 06:50 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 989
Received 9 Upvotes on 9 Posts
We typically spec ChemRex/Sonneborne or L&M Construction Chemicals products, but I don't know that I have ever heard a bad report on other manufacturers. Anyone else??

Bruce
 
  #13  
Old 06-05-03, 09:50 AM
johnnyd2
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Slab is done!

turned out well, used 150 Owens Corning, stapled 3 250' loops of Wirsbro to the insulation, whole tubing/manifold system still holding 40 lbs, re rod over that. Cement (11 yards for the floor slab) came on one front-loader. Compacted my gravel driveway nicely.

Finisher ran crew of three early 20's guys, one (his son) assisted with finishing, other two shleped 'barrows. Had a power screeder, 30 ' handle floater, 4' power trowel. Hit the slab 5 times with the trowler, last one at 9:30 PM.

I rollered on the first coat of sealer next morning, second coat late afternoon.

Next day compacted and poured 18x19 apron, rough broom finish, complicated sloping to match two grade levels. Coated that last night with sealer. Forms strip this afternoon.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: