proper masonry bit?


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Old 02-23-04, 09:04 AM
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proper masonry bit?

I've been trying to install some molding into brick around an exterior door. I've purchased several bits from my local Big Box home improvement store. They have all dulled to uselessness after only 2-3 pilot holes.

My drill is a cordless 14v that only gets up to about 400-700 RPM. I suppose it's possible that the drill may be the problem as well since the RPMs are relatively low.

Who makes a good bit that will retain a good cutting point for longer?
 
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Old 02-23-04, 11:26 AM
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Try A Hammer Drill

Most Masonry bits are designed to be used in a hammer drill. Try to find a drill with hammer action. The bits will last longer.
 
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Old 02-24-04, 07:15 AM
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There are masonry bits designed for use with a regular rotary drill. The package of the ones I have even says they are NOT for use in a hammer drill. I've only used them on cinder block, but they should be OK on brick as well. For concrete I don't know. In any case, they're a lot cheaper than buying a hammer drill.
 
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Old 02-24-04, 07:29 AM
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Most masonry bits should be carbide tipped - make sure.
I drill alot of mortar, brick, concrete holes(with a 14.4v). Even the carbides will dull after a few holes. I've invested in a Drill Dr for re-sharpening all my bits.

fred
 
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Old 02-24-04, 08:16 PM
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Carbide tip bits are designed to be used in hammer drills because they chip away concrete in a hole and the rotation removes the material they have broken. Rotation only is a cutting action and it is very difficult to cut concrete, brick or block, which is why the bit dulls so quickly. A good quality carbide tipped bit should last hundreds of holes. Also, hammer action with a standard drill is not that much more expense when buying a drill and it makes the occasional job of drilling into cement-based materials much easier and quicker.
 
 

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