crumbling chimney flue


  #1  
Old 04-09-05, 04:41 PM
Jay Levine
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crumbling chimney flue

I have two flues on my chimney - one is rectangular and is in good condition, the other is square and there is not much left of it. I saw pieces of it on the roof and was able to "snap" off chunks on my own. These flues are dark red - I guess they are clay. Do I need to have this replaced? I also need to set a new chimney cap because the existing one is crumbling. Any ideas on how I would create a form (out of 2x4s) to pour the concrete into. And now that I think about it, how can I pour a chimney cap when one of the flues is in such bad condition? And what are the flues for anyway? Any help would be appreciated!
 
  #2  
Old 04-09-05, 06:55 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
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crumbling chimney flue

You should contact a mason contractor and have him take a look at it. It doesn't sound like a job for a chimney sweep. Considering your lack of familiarity with flues this would be the best step.

Considering the height of all this weight and the possiblity of interior deterioration clogging the the flue you should look toward someone who builds these things. A sweep can clean, tuckpoint, attach caps and other items, but any removal and rebuilding should be done by a mason.

Good access will make it easier to get a mason.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 04-10-05, 07:23 AM
Shanley
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I would suggest you have a mason contractor inspect your chimney, typically its just the top few flues (the ones above the roof line) that are deteriorated so it's not an overly difficult clay liner replacement and chimney repair/recap...It gets a little trickier if the majority of the liners are cracked or damaged...There are contractors who reline chimneys with refactory (high heat resistant) concrete...The process involves lowering a pneumatic baloon like device down the existing liner, inflating, pouring the refactory concrete,let cure, defate the device and remove and recap the chimney and repair the access points...The number of access points will depend on the number of liner offsets (bends) in the chimney cavity...This is a bit intrusive in interior chimneys...The major drawback of this process is the reduction in the net cross sectional area of the liner which could choke what is venting in the liner, such as a boiler or furnace and damage the unit...The boiler/furnace owners manual or local building code (for fireplaces) should include the required net cross sectional area of the liner.
 
  #4  
Old 04-10-05, 02:59 PM
Jay Levine
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Thanks for the good advice!
 
 

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