Artificial Cement


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Old 07-09-05, 08:22 AM
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Artificial Cement

Ok guys here it is. I was just watching HGTV channel. Some Calif contractor was building a concrete block wall. Instead of using standard concrete, cement and morter, he was using the artificial cement in a tube by Stone Mason. He just squirted it on the block kinda of thick, and set the next block in place. Has anyone ever done this before ? Is the strength there ?
I have never heard of such a thing. Thanks,
PS: This is not a test.
 
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Old 07-10-05, 12:17 AM
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I've never seen it used. I'm curious now as to what it's made of.

I also wonder how it compares in price. It sounds easy to use. Hmmm.
 
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Old 07-10-05, 08:18 AM
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Probably some crap caulk or glue mixture. Last time i bought something that was supposed to fix a mortar joint, it was just a caulk with an offwhite coloring.
 
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Old 07-10-05, 02:10 PM
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This mortar adhesive seems to have a lot of promise in the construction industry. You can read more about Mason Bond here: http://heh.pl/&t3

This may not be the exact product that you saw demonstrated, but it is the same ilk.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 07-10-05, 09:11 PM
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do you know if this product is available commercially to DIYers?
 
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Old 07-10-05, 09:42 PM
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Artificial Concrete

Yes, it is. About 4.59 a tube. Menards sell alot of it. In fact, they have a hard time keeping it in stock.
 
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Old 07-10-05, 09:45 PM
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Artificial Cement

I am not familiar with the California product, but I have looked into the Mason Bond. It appears to be an adhesive and not a mortar. Without seeing the chemical composition, I would assume it is an adhesive with a filler of some sort. It may be used as a patch instead of tuck pointing if you can live with the appearance.

The first adhesive for walls I saw were in the late 1960's when Dow brought out a product. None have been successful for wall construction of any scale. All have greater bond, tensile and shear strength than conventional mortar, but these factors are usually not a factor is normal construction. All have lower compressive strengths because they cannot compensate for point loading and variations in the height of different units in the wall. The compressive strengths are generally between 40% to 75% of the strength of conventional construction.

The durability and compatibility of most of the alternate "mortars" has not been demonstrated to my knowledge.

I am not aware on any of these mortar replacements being accepted by any building code, so it is a buyer beware situation if it is used in constuction required to meet codes.

I would like to see more attempts to improve mortar but there have not been any appreciable changes for quite a few centuries.

Dick
 
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Old 07-11-05, 02:03 AM
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Some Calif contractor was making dinner for his kids. Instead of buying groceries and working in the kitchen, he was unpacking bags from the fast food drive thru.
 
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Old 07-11-05, 01:38 PM
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At 4.59/tube, they can keep it.
 
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Old 07-11-05, 06:30 PM
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Artificial Concrete

Thanks guys for all the input. But you all know that having been in Construction for 35 years, along with your help, I dug it out. It is manufactured in Canada. They make it for many different things. This stuff is pretty good. It looks like concrete, feels like it, works like it, and is stronger then concrete. I had some shipped in, and we ran two tests today.
One with concrete with an extra dose of Portland Cement, and one batch using their product. Both were put on top of a cement block 1/2" thick, let stand 1 minute, and then set another cement block on top of it. Let dry for 2 hours. At the end of two hours, we first lifted the cement set. We held it by the top block. At 2 minutes the bottom block dropped off. Then the artificial cement The bottom block never did fall off. So we got out the hammer drill and ran it between the blocks. We never did get the blocks apart, but one of the cement blocks did break. This stuff is great. It is for small stuff or little jobs, but it does work great. web site www.usehickson.com It is made in Canada. Thanks for your help guys.
 
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Old 07-11-05, 11:46 PM
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I'm surprised the cement lifted a block's weight after curing only two hours,

and can't see the experiment relating to normal cement and mortar applications,

except that this goop cures more rapidly than regular cement mix, and seems glueier. So thanks for telling us.


I recently stuck up some architectural bling blings with fast-setting epoxy (for speed) *and* cement (for bulk and joint appearance) - I buttered each object with *both*, that is, and had a hectic time at it. Mason Bond alone would have been easier.
 
 

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