Need to take down a chimney


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Old 09-15-05, 06:29 AM
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Need to take down a chimney

I need to take down a chimney that's part of a one story den wall that needs to come down to. I have taken down exterior walls before so I own, or can easily rent, the usual demolition tools and equipment. I'm concerned about safety, property damage and efficiency. Anybody have any advice on how to best proceed?
 
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Old 09-15-05, 03:42 PM
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First, I'm not totally clear if this is inside or outside, but it seems like it's inside. Some portion though, must go through the ceiling then through the roof, or some portion must rise above the ceiling and above the roofline outside. What is it made of?
 
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Old 09-16-05, 06:55 AM
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It's brick and it's in great shape, it's just in a really stupid place. Most of the chimney is above the one story, 4/12 pitch, shed roof line. The fireplace in the wall will also have to come out. I'm not that worried about the wall as most of it will rebuilt to fit new doors and windows and I'm competent in using temporary walls to accomodate this.

I'm headed in the direction of puting up scaffolding and taking it down one brick at a time until a flue pipe section can be removed. Doing this over and over again.

My biggest concern at this time is work efficiency and safety. I want to use a demolition chisel (air or electric) but I don't want to have a whole section of brick collapse off of the chimney at once. I was also thinking that I could cut a horizontal line through the brick mortar, two or three courses high, and remove these all at once.

Any thoughts?
 
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Old 09-16-05, 07:47 AM
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Need to take down a chimney

You will have a problem taking it down in big chunks. They are awkaward, heavy and can break at any time. The bigger the piece, the bigger the equipment needed up in the air. One big chunck can cause a lot of damage to a roof or person.

Work off a scaffold that will give you room and a place to tie off if it is high. A brick or two at a time into a dumpster is much quicker than you think. Work from a corner and always working on a brick with two free edges is best. You may have to try several different tools and configurations to find what works best for the combination of age, brick and mortar. don't overlook a hammer and chisel. You will loosen brick as fast as you can toss them down.

Dick
 
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Old 09-16-05, 02:49 PM
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I agree w/Concretemasonry. As solid as the chimney seems, a well placed chisel with some blows from a baby sledge will undermine it quickly. As he indicated, once you get a rythm and feel for how some bricks come apart, you'll be able to work your way down easily. Just be sure that you're on a stable scaffold, that nobody is below, and that you stay away from those nasty power wires.

Good luck!
 
 

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