Cement grout different colors


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Old 09-15-05, 07:40 PM
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Cement grout different colors

I put in a bunch of bullnose brick on several wall sections. On one wall, I put plastic over the brick for a week to slow down curing. On the other sections I just sprayed with water a few times a day for a week or so.

The grout joints that were covered are quite dark compared to the joints on the sections I sprayed (it has been about 2 weeks since install). It's no big deal but I'm wondering if they will lighten over time. I guess one should always use the same cure method on all parts of a project.

Also, regarding the joint shaping on the bullnose - I was using a jointer (I forget which size but the one commonly used for brick) and when I started I noticed that the joints were not that deep and somewhat mis-shapen because they start out flush with the brick surface. Later, I started using the jointer to first scrape out a small amount of mortar and then re-shape with a larger tool that allows a curve from edge to edge.

Also, the surface of the brick gets messy and initially I was using a very wet sponge to clean the brick. I don't think it's a good idea to get lots of water on fresh grout joints because they become rough/sandy in appearance. After noticing this I started using a damp sponge only and just worked the brick itself. It's a lot of work to install these! Anyhow if you have any tips on finishing these or if above is not the usual technique let me know.

Thanks
 

Last edited by AlexH; 09-15-05 at 07:53 PM.
  #2  
Old 09-16-05, 08:05 AM
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Cement grout different colors

Many things can affect the color of mortar. Tooling the joints early will give a different color than tooling later. Consistancy is the key to color uniformity. There is no need to apply plastic to slow down curing.

Often it is better to touch the wall as little as possible while the mortar is fresh. Cut off excess mortar with a trowel and do not work it in with a sponge or brush while it is wet. A brush can remove much of the material if it allowed to dry. You can also wash the wall after you are done.

Dick
 
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Old 09-16-05, 10:03 AM
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Also,

I poured a 50 sq ft 4" thick concrete slab as a base for flagstone. The slab was not troweled (only screeded) so it is very rough. The slab is 3 1/2" below grade and the brick edging. In retrospect I only needed 2 1/2" below grade but at the time I wasn't sure how thick my flagstone would be.

As it turns out the flagstone will average about 1 1/2" thick which means my mortar base under the flags will be 2" thick. I'm using concrete sand partly because I have a lot left over and I figure for this mortar bed thickness it may give added strength. I typically use a 1:3 Portland/sand mix. Is a 2 1/2" thick mortar base acceptable? I could lay down 1 1/2" of concrete first but it's double work.
 
 

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