does water go through mortar (below grade)?


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Old 12-05-05, 09:34 AM
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does water go through mortar (below grade)?

I have a leak in the cinder blocks of the below grade portion of my shed.

I dug out the previously backfilled dirt exposing the leaking wall. I then poured pure Portland cement mix right where the bottom block meets the concrete floor. WAS THIS A BAD THING TO DO?

I was going to use more pure Portland cement mix and slap it on the sides but the local Home Depot is out of stock and I'm now faced with the choice of either the expensive hydraulic cement mix or just cooking up a batch of cheap mortar,

what should I do at this point?

-MC
 
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Old 12-05-05, 11:36 AM
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does water go through mortar (below grade)?

You used a combination of both the wrong material and the wrong method.

To seal the joint between the floor and wall you chip out the crack to a dovetail opening and grout solidly with hydraulic cement. You can seal this joint, but remember, your basement is built in a big hole that can collect water. Look at your exterior drainage and downspout extensions.

To eliminate the water problem from the outside after you excavated, you should put in drain tile to remove the water before it gets into or under the floor/wall. This is the best long term solution. Any thing less on the outside is just a band aid solution.

Dick
 
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Old 12-05-05, 11:58 AM
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forgive my ignorance but

1. What is a "dovetail opening"?

2. What is "drain tile"?

thks,

-MC
 
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Old 12-05-05, 12:22 PM
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A dovetail opening is where you have a slightly larger cavity than the opening. Mainly you need to scratch open a crack to fill with the hydraulic cement.

Drain tile is a pipe with small slits that allows water to enter and then run out the pipe to a predetermined exit area.

The correct method for sealing and draining the exterior foundation is to stucco the block [fills any pores], seal the stucco with foundation tar and then lay the drain tile covered with gravel.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 01:54 PM
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wow, I'm in for quite a bit of work here

to properly do the drain tile, I'd have to dig out the entire backfill before laying down the pipe and gravel. I don't even think they did that when building my house basement but then again in that case, poured concrete was used.

I'll stick with the hydraulic cement and not backfill just yet using that as an experiment, before digging out the rest of the backfill on the other sides maybe I'll hammer out the inside of the block and fill that with hydraulic cement, that'd be easier

thanks for the tips, I appreciate it,

-MC
 
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Old 12-05-05, 02:45 PM
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does water go through mortar (below grade)?

Filling the cores of the block won't do it.

The joint between the floor and wall (block or concrete) is a common leakage point. Take care of that with instructions on the hydraulic cement package (or Thoroplug - same stuff). AFTER that try some "miracle" waterproofer like Drylock or Thoroseal - paint it on the wall.

Dick
 
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Old 12-05-05, 03:19 PM
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the holes of the blocks are already filled

each and everyone over the course of a very excruciating weekend.

I was referring to the joints. once I hammer off the outer edge of the block exposing both the fills and the unacceptably filled joints I could then force in the hydraulic cement where needed,

the lesson here: always use poured concrete (below grade at least)

-MC
 
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Old 12-05-05, 03:40 PM
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does water go through mortar (below grade)?

Wrong about the poured basement comments - each has its strong points. After you repair the wall the way you plant, you still may have leakage because you have not gone after the source.

Knocking of the face shells and exposing/filling the cores is wrong. You will never do a good enough job - I have seen if many times. There will always be cracks you cannot fill completely because of accessibility.

Concentrate on the job of opening the bad mortar joints and the crack at the floor/wall juncture. Pack in hydraulic cement as directed. Then use the waterproofing on the wall. If that does not work you will have to use drain tile to remove the "underground lake" around your basement.

I assume you have taken care of the easiest, cheapest and most effective method by having downspout extensions and proper drainage.

Good luck with your ideas.

Dick
 
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Old 12-19-05, 01:21 PM
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leaking concrete block walls in below grade shed

and in case it saves anyone some time & effort, neither drylock nor packing hydraulic cement in a dovetail opening did much to slow my leaking problem
 
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Old 12-19-05, 02:30 PM
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does water go through mortar (below grade)?

You used the right method by using hydraulic cement in a joint or crack that permits your to pack it or wedge it in.

Drylok is just a coating where there is not any water pressure against the wall.

Perhaps you have too much water or there was a problem with the techique. The hydraulic cement method is widely used.

Waterproofing after the fact is always more difficult.

Dick
 
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Old 12-29-05, 04:14 PM
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not gonna stop the leaking

the basement guy said the unless you have poured concrete, the concrete blocks will always lose the battle against water.

drylock, hydraulic cement, outside waterproofing are all temporary.

I already did the outside waterproofing when I originally built this thing

then again I may just move the equipment outside, stick up posts and a tarp and have an "outdoor gym"

-MC
 
 

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