can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?


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Old 12-16-05, 10:36 AM
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can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?

I have cinder blocks that are filled and I want to hammer off the face layer (not the inside filling), is there something like a sledge hammer with an edged tip instead of a blunt tip?
 
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Old 12-16-05, 11:12 AM
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can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?

A hammer and masons chisel are normally used. You probably have concrete block and not the old cinder block, that are very weak.

It is unusual to remove just a face shell and since you are comfromising the strength of the wall. What is the purpose?

Dick
 
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Old 12-16-05, 11:53 AM
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removing the face shell

this goes back to an earlier posting we talked about where my shed is below grade and is leaking. every rain/snow I can count on 2-3" of water.

I know the proper solution is to install the tile drains around the perimeter but there's no way I'm digging down 4' on 3 sides (or actually lower to properly install the drain) not to mention getting the gravel and sloping it down, etc.

This shed has cost me so much time and money already it's ridiculous so right now I'm just looking for the easiest way out even if it's not the proper way to do things. I had put dry-lock all over the wall, that was useless.

This weekend I'm about to chisel an area where the concrete block meets the floor and pack it with hydraulic cement (That's where the leak is).

I don't have a lot of confidence in that method lasting any good length of time (if at all) so what I know should work is to tear the face off those cinder blocks (the stick/board/siding portion rests in the middle area on top of the filled holes) and packing any/all gaps with hydraulic cement.

If I have to repack the hydraulic cement in a few months, I can live with that, I just don't have a multi-day/weekend block of time to do the job right

I know that sounds bad,

-MC
 
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Old 12-16-05, 12:37 PM
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I found the tool

I was told that a "brick hammer" would do what I need

-MC
 
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Old 12-16-05, 01:22 PM
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can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?

If you don't have a confodence in the normal method of making and small crack to fill with hydraulic cement, then be my guest to take your approach. Hydraulic cement is intended to be confined to worl as a crack sealant. It is not a patch-on, smear-on type of product.

I hope you find what you expect after you have removed the face shells.

Apparently there is no way to divert the water away from the structure.

Dick
 
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Old 12-16-05, 01:33 PM
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ok now I'm confused

I figured if hydraulic cement can stop water from leaking through a crack then if I smeared it all over an area it would fill into any/all cracks in the area, no?

the purpose of tearing off the face of the blocks is to expose the areas that may have cracks since the blocks themselves are porous,

-MC
 
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Old 12-16-05, 02:31 PM
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Could you use an epoxy paint or other waterproof sealant perhaps, rather than hydraulic cement?
 
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Old 12-19-05, 01:11 PM
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thanks for the tip, I won't do that

and in case it saves anyone some time & effort, neither drylock nor hydraulic cement in a dovetail opening did much to slow my leaking problem
 
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Old 12-19-05, 02:38 PM
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can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?

Epoxy paint painr could help IF you could get the concrete (interior also) dry enough to get a good bond and have enough elasticity to bridge all the cracks and joints between the elements (wall and floor) that could move due to shrinkage, temperature and pressure. I have only seen it work in highly controlled conditions.

Dick
 
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Old 12-20-05, 10:31 AM
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this is far from a highly controlled situation

I'm having a basement waterproofing outfit come over to evaluate my options.

I have a feeling that the cheapest thing to do is install a drain system and pump on the inside which would run big $$ so most likely my wife will order me to demolish the shed and move the gym to the basement of our homw

-MC
 
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Old 12-20-05, 11:04 AM
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can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?

It is possible to do it yourself if you rent a couple of tools and have some help. This could eliminate going to the gym for a week or two.

I did it with some help (father-in-law for 2 nights of sawing) and from my 12 year old son and his buddies to help haul in and haul out. It took about two weeks of evenings - not every evening.

Because of my high soil pressures I did not saw out the entire trench, but left a few 12" wide sections to keep the base of the wall from moving in. I had to dig under these by hand, but no big deal. I started by digging and putting in the sump. Then I could work around the basement and the sump pump handled the water as I dug. I went below the footings to collect more water, so my drain tile was slightly further inside the basement wall. I estimate the water outside the wall was about 3-5 feet above the basement floor. My drainage in the front of the house was so good that my car could slide down the driveway if the warm tires melted the ice a bit, but I still had water due to the clay soil.

You can do it.

Dick
 
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Old 12-20-05, 03:31 PM
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on a kind of separate note

of course AFTER I spend money on drylock and hydraulic cement (neither of which do jack) I am told that the best sealant to use where the wall meets the floor is:

3M Marine adhesive sealant 5200

of course this is $6 for a handheld tube,

anyone have experience with this?

-MC
 
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Old 12-20-05, 03:43 PM
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can anyone recommend a tool to chip off pieces of filled cinder block?

With all the problems you seem to have with this structure, the problem is more basic than a qucik fix from a tube.

You are trying band-aids without attacking the source - drainage and moisture accumulation of water around your foundation.

People have looked for years and have not come up with any miracle yet.

If you think it is cheap and hyraulic cement is expensive, give it a try.

Everyone is willing to help. Perhaps some photos of the building and surrounding areas and some interior shots will help you get the answers you want or don't want.

Dick
 
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Old 12-20-05, 04:00 PM
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yeah I think you're right

forget the tube of marine adhesive sealant idea

for me it boils down to either it's cheaper to direct the water out or it's cheaper to demolish the whole thing and move the gym equipment into the house

-MC
 
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Old 12-21-05, 05:31 AM
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just add course of block

How big is this shed??? If you and some buddies can remove the structure from the block, add another course of block (which should hopefully get you above grade) and then lay down a new floor and replace shed...you hopefully should be OK. I dont know much about the water problems but if you lay down that new course and drylock it, you might be OK.
 
 

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