Foundation Underpinning Job


  #1  
Old 01-11-06, 10:59 AM
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Question Foundation Underpinning Job

I'm planning on hiring a concrete contractor to convert my crawl space (32X13) into a full basement. I've gotten my prices and am ready to proceed.
My question is, if I negotiate the price of the concrete directly with the
ready-mix company (my friend owns a local ready mix firm) would the price of the job be significantly less (50 yards of short loads) or would I annoy the
concrete contractor by working directly with the ready mix firm? Also, assuming I got a better price from the ready mix firm, could the contractor work directly with them using my price? I'm looking to save sizable dollars here (>$1,500), am I wasting my time?
 
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Old 01-11-06, 11:26 AM
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Saving $1,500 on 50 yards of concrete would mean that your friend would have to give you a break of $30 per yard. I don't see it happening. Ready mix companies don't make that kind of profit. They deal in volume, and 50 yards worth of short loads means they spend more in fuel and labor than they would if they were full loads.
I doubt that it would bother the contractor to get the concrete at your lower price, but you better run it by him and your friend to see if it's ok with them both. Also, ask your friend the amount of discount you can expect.

Pecos
 
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Old 01-11-06, 01:19 PM
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Foundation Underpinning Job

Everytime you get a short load of concrete you are getting a gift even if you pay the high surcharges. Delievery is one of the highest costs in running a ready-mix business. A concrete producer cannot add on enough to cover the real extra cost ($75 to $150 per hour for a truck). The surcharges are just an attempt to get something back and still provide the service that is required to keep long time customers. Every short load hurts a customer that wants a full load on time.

The best thing your friend can do is give your contractor good service to keep the labor cost down.

Let your friend and the contractor decide who pays the bill. Your friend may want you to pay since his long term customer (the contractor) is probably stretched out because of slow payments from his long time customers.

Dick
 
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Old 01-11-06, 07:34 PM
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"Let your friend and the contractor decide who pays the bill. Your friend may want you to pay since his long term customer (the contractor) is probably stretched out because of slow payments from his long time customers."
LMAO !!! this guy knows the business .
 
 

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