Bowing Basement Wall Repair


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Old 03-13-06, 01:59 PM
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Bowing Basement Wall Repair

Our basement wall is cracking and bowing. We got an estimate to rebuild the wall - at over $20,000 we would like to repair this ourselves. I have talked to someone who purchased from a local store (a few years ago) a "deadmen". Basically he explained this as a two large plates and you sandwich the bowing wall with the plates. Then you drill a hole in the foundation wall and use a threaded rod to pull the wall back straight. He said the plates where large, maybe 3 or 4 feet tall. Anyone know where we can find these? The local store he purchased them from doesn't carry them anymore. Thanks.
 
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Old 03-13-06, 05:04 PM
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You should probably have someone repair this for you. What is the wall constructed of, and can you remove the fill on the outside of the wall.
 
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Old 03-13-06, 05:39 PM
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Bowing Basement Wall Repair

Definitely not a DIY project!!!

You have to get anchors in the soil outside the basement (piling or excavate and put in plates with compacted soil, etc.) that are strong enough to pull the wall out with. If the anchors move, the wall will move back in.

You would be better off excavating around the wall (put in drain tile for the cheapest insurance in the world), rebuild the wall and backfill with granular backfill and not the local junk you dug out.

Dick
 
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Old 03-14-06, 08:15 AM
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Wall Construction

There is no way we can afford to pay someone to fix this wall. We have plenty of help and my dad is from a family of brick layers. The wall is constructed of cinder blocks. We will have a backhoe to dig dirt away from the wall. I have read about the Grip Tite wall anchors and this is similar to what we had already heard about. We will definitely install drain tile and make sure the drainage is excellent - we wouldn't want this to happen again. We had called about having Grip Tite installed and it is more expensive than rebuilding the whole wall. Our house is resting directly on the cinderblock - not on a wood board on top of the cinder block. Since our house is brick, someone in the family mentioned knocking the wall down could make our brick fall since that is all that is holding the brick up. Thank you for your ideas and suggestions and if you have any more, please feel free to share.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 05:26 PM
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Good luck, make sure your homeowners and life insurance is paid up before you start.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 07:17 AM
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Wink

You have to takle this job as underpining. Repair the wall in 4' long sections, remove a section, pour footing, lay block, let dry two days and repeat until its done. Leave rebar and dura wall sticking out so it ties the whole wall together, also rebar for verticle support.
Frank


Remember the Forums title is Do It Yourself, Not call a Contractor!, Give people the steps to complete the work and its up to them if they want to do the job or call in help.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 01:46 PM
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Frank99

Thank you for your help! We appreciate it.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 02:57 PM
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Frank I whole heartedly agree with the concept of DIY and the principal of this board, but the fact remains this is a very labor intensive project that has SERIOUS concequences should an uninformed DIY type start just digging into it. I dont think any qualified individual here would feel right sending a novice into this type of work with some internet jabber and later find out the house fell/dropped in that section, or cave in occured, etc...We can offer advise on methods and which is best in personal opinions, but as far as step by steps it's just too large with too much liabilty. Cant wait for the day we hear about somebody sueing over liability issues due to information being taken from the internet DIY forums.

I'm sure there is a police forum somewhere and just cuz a concerned citizen asks how to storm a crack house and implement citizens arrests, there would'nt be too many officers offering advise on how to do somthing that could and most likely will wind up with catastrophic results...sometimes there just has to be a line drawn.

Sometimes the best answer is one that will protect DIY'ers from themselves.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 06:19 PM
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Exactly. I KNOW how to do it, and I would not do this repair on my own house, even though I have the materials and equipment to do it. It simply has to be done by someone that can do the proper engineering and that carries liability insurance. In fact, it could well make the house un-salable if you were to do it yourself, or make you you liable down the road if you did the repair and then sold it.
 
 

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