Best way to side cinder block


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Old 04-14-06, 09:46 AM
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Best way to side cinder block

I'm looking to side my house this year and am looking for advice on how I would get started. Here is a picture of the house so those who can help can get a good Idea of what I mean.

http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/5782/p3280004copy3fl.jpg

Copy and paste the link I guess.

How would I go about siding this eyesore of a house. I plan to use CharterOak brand vinyl siding. Clapboard style Ivy Green color with Glacier white trim. I also plan to replace all the windows. Should I be building a frame around the exterior of the cinder block portion with 2X4's and plywood or do something else. I would like to insulate if I build the frame around the house for better weatherization of the house itself. If I do build the frame is it best to run the 2X4's vertically or horizontally? What should I use to secure the 2X4's to the house. Any thoughts on doing the windows? Tear them all out, build the frame and then install or just put them in as needed and build the frame around them? What do you think a project like this would cost if I provided all the materials. I live in Central NY state. Please if anyone can provide any tips or advice I would appreciate it.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 03:34 PM
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Best way to side cinder block

cstmstyle-

From the appearance and your location, you have a home built out of normal weight concrete block and not cinder block. It apparently has served well for a few years.

I cannot offer to much information on the windows since I bought new thermopane windows to replace my old wood windows and storms on a 80 years old wood frame home and saved nothing, but did provide easier operating windows.

If you want to go with the cheapest possible (vinyl siding), apply a house wrap, strip the exterior with 1x3 or 1x4s vertically. This will provide a way to handle the details of the window sills you have. It will also minimize the window installation prblems if you replace the windows.

Since you do not have a wood structure, you may possibly have the option of a Dryvit system. It is not permitted on wood frame structures in many areas, but New York may permit it for a residential concrete masonry wall. It offers the advantage of keeping the thermal mass of the concrete masonry inside the insulation envelope.

A combination of conventional stucco and cultured stone may be an attractive option for a home of your style.

Just a few thoughts.

Dick
 
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Old 04-15-06, 01:03 PM
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thanks for the info i already have bought all the replacement windows and am in the process of buying the siding and trim. Was just looking for advice on best possible way to put everything together. Thanks again for your input, I appreciate it.

Anyone else have any thoughts? I plan on removing the window sills to make everything flush to start out with.
 
 

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