Getting a wacker plate compactor to jobsite

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Old 06-22-06, 05:18 PM
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Getting a wacker plate compactor to jobsite

I'm doing a small concrete paver install - local rental shop has a Wacker plate compactor that weighs about 200lbs. The jobsite is on the side of my house and is not accessible by truck. Somehow I have to get this unit 30 ft down a 4' wide cement walkway and 20' across a lawn.

The Wacker does not appear to have wheels. I have a couple of furniture dolly's and I could borrow a heavy duty hand truck.

I have never used the compactor but am I right in assuming -

The unit has to be wheeled across cement which could probably be accomplished by the furniture dollys.

The unit is probably best slid across the grass by pushing/pulling it.

One way or another I should be able to get it to where I need it, right?
 
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Old 06-22-06, 05:46 PM
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I would just get a couple of guys and carry it.
 
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Old 06-22-06, 07:00 PM
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start it up and let it vibrate it's way to the job site.
it's not that bad.
 
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Old 06-22-06, 07:16 PM
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Use a hand tamper, about 10lbs, or load it on a wagon
 
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Old 06-23-06, 03:00 AM
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The plate compactor should have carrying handles. Do as scarborough says and get a couple of guys to carry it. That's how we move ours. The dolly will work to roll it on the concrete. You could start it up and let it walk across the grass on its own. It moves itself by vibration (like those little football players in the old time electric football games we had when we were kids). If you start it up on the concrete, it will move itself but will give you and your nighbors one heck of a headache from the noise. It will bounce like one of those low-rider cars with the hydraulics. Good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 06-24-06, 04:36 PM
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Thanks,

It's listed as 200lbs but I think that's after you put the water in it. Without water I can lift by myself (although I wouldn't try carrying it!).

One other question - I'm putting pavers in a 35'x4' path that has access from only one end. Because of this I'm assuming I have to put down a few feet of sand, then place pavers and repeat, right?

You can't walk all over the sand after it's been screeded, right?

Thanks
 
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Old 06-24-06, 05:37 PM
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Getting a wacker plate compactor to jobsite

You would have the best results if you leveled the 1" sand setting bed, laid ALL the pavers and then put in the edge restraint. After that, you would vibrate the sand into the joint on the entire walk at the same time.

Vibrating sections of the walk will cause the paver joints to open and the pavers to move toward the unfinished end.

If you are not using any edge restraint, then it won't make any difference since the joints will open up somewhat and you can expect some differential settlement of the pavers in the future.

Dick
 
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Old 06-24-06, 06:39 PM
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Do what Concretemasonry said or forget the compactor - it will fail.
 
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Old 06-25-06, 08:07 AM
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The base should be graded and compacted first as this will reflect in the finished product. After the base is compacted, then install the 1" of sand using screeds to get it even. Lay the pavers and work from one end you can walk on the pavers just laid but not the sand, then fill in the joints and then compact again.
Also some plate compactors have a little tank for water for doing small asphalt jobs, the water will have little efffect on the weight. Two men should be able to handle the weight of the machine.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by AlexH
Thanks,


You can't walk all over the sand after it's been screeded, right?

Thanks
You can get some scrap plywood or lumber to lay on the sand to walk on after its been leveled and compacted. This will make it possible to walk over it with minimal disturbance to the prepared surface.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 02:18 PM
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Oops, double post.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 03:37 PM
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The sand gets screeded loose, not compacted.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 05:12 PM
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I have seen it done both ways. In this area, most contractors plate compact the sand after screeding and before they set the pavers. You should design your lay so that you do not walk on the sand, but work over the freshly laid pavers.

I always prelay one side of the edge restraint to work against, then put down the other side when I am a paver or 3 away from completion (depending upon the number of cuts and the pattern). If it is curvy, I lay it about 3 bricks away, if it is straight, I lay it before the final paver.

I begin sanding within a few feet of the working edges and plate compact when all restraints are in place, keeping 4 foot or so behind the working edge for big jobs, and wait until complete for small ones.
 
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Old 07-09-06, 07:40 PM
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"In this area, most contractors plate compact the sand after screeding and before they set the pavers."



The thing that makes them interlocking pavers is the fact that they are compacted into loose sand, thus interlocking the paver w/the bed. I know guys think that compacting the bed first is OK, but it's really not.
 
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Old 07-09-06, 08:00 PM
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The interlock is provided by the sand from the top, and the plate compactor drives them into the compacted sand anyway. It doesn't matter which way you do it in the least.
 
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Old 07-09-06, 08:17 PM
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Getting a wacker plate compactor to jobsite

Look at the industry standards and the manufacturers installation instructions. They say you should vibrate the sand down into the joints between the pavers.

This insures that the individual pavers act as a continuous surface to distribute the loads. The amount of interlock determines the strength and stability of the paving surface and is the reason some laying patterns are better for high loads.

The goal is not to vibrate the paver into the sand, although it may happen slightly. The purpose of the sand under the pavers is to provide a smooth level surface to lay the pavers on. You should compact the base before applying the 1" sand setting bed.

People that compact the setting bed sand before laying pavers probably also make the mistake of not using edge restraints.

Dick
 
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Old 07-09-06, 08:22 PM
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I would beg to differ, ConcreteMasonry, since most of the commercial paver installers in this area compact the bed.
 
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