Is my concreete toast?


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Old 07-01-06, 03:30 PM
J
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Is my concreete toast?

Today I replaced a fence post, removed the old concrete and used a 5 gallon bucket as my form with a large hole in the bottom. I used 2 bags of Quickrete. I don't mix my own concrete but I have done it before.

How can I tell if I put too much water in it? It doesn't seem to be setting up. If I did put too much water in it, I didn't have a lot extra. I see some water on the surface that has gathered, maybe 1/8 cup worth, near where I stuck in the new fence post. Do I need to take this out and start over?

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-01-06, 03:38 PM
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Joe,
I don't think you have a problem. I usually use the "dry" mix method. Pour concrete mix into the hole and add water. The excess water will come to the surface. I would not worry about it. Good luck.
 
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Old 07-01-06, 03:51 PM
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Is my concreete toast?

Just be patient.

The cement will use water as it cures. The soil will also draw away some moisture as it leaks out of the plastic form.

Concrete needs water to cure. An excess could be a problem for a slab or structural, but not for a fence post.

Dick
 
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Old 07-01-06, 06:11 PM
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You shouldn't need a form for a fence post. You should dig to undisturbed soil, and allow the concrete to key to the dirt. I have never been a fan of the dry method.
 
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Old 07-02-06, 01:18 PM
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The fence post turned out fine, thanks all.


Originally Posted by Tscarborough
You shouldn't need a form for a fence post. You should dig to undisturbed soil, and allow the concrete to key to the dirt. I have never been a fan of the dry method.
Where I live it is wise to use a form, the ground expands and contracts due to high clay content. With a smooth, plastic surface as the form the ground won't shift the concrete as much over time vs. no form.
 
 

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