Slabjacking


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Old 07-05-06, 08:09 PM
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Question Slabjacking

A portion of my driveway has cracked and sunk by about 3 inches. It's adjacent to my basement wall, and water pools in there, making the basement wall damp.

I'd like to raise that slab, and have read about Slabjacking. Does anybody have experience with this, and any idea how it is priced? Also, I would need to be assured that the process won't push my basement wall in.
 
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Old 07-05-06, 08:35 PM
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Slabjacking

Slabjacking, concrete raising or mudjacking, whatever you call it, has been used for many years with good results. It was first used in engineering projects, but has spread into the residential market.

One of the reasons for the use is the cost and ability to correct a problem quickly with a minimum of a mess.

The pressure is much lower than you would expect, especially for a driveway slab, since you apply the pressure over such a large area. The effect on your wall is probably not much different than having a heavy car parked on that part of the slab.

Contact a contractor and have him look at it. They don't like to waste their time on projects that are questionable.

Dick
 
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Old 12-08-06, 06:52 PM
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Here's a followup:

I hired a local company to come in for the job. They charged around $7.00 per square foot (measured as the size of the slab to be raised), with a $750 minimum. These are approximates--it was a few months ago.

My slab was only about 50 square feet, so I paid the $750. It was worth every penny. The job took about 2 hours. 1 guy did the whole thing, and it left a few small holes in the slab that were patched well. The slab is now perfectly level. Actually, it slopes slightly away from the house as it should. I still check it out each morning as I leave the house--what a clever and satisfying solution to this common problem.
 
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Old 12-08-06, 07:29 PM
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Slabjacking

Glad to hear it worked. It certainly beats the cost and mess of a tear-out.

It has been used sucessfully for many years.

It takes an experienced contractor to do it AND to recognize when it is the proper soultion. It does not work everywhere.

The vertical presuure used to raise the slab is low, so the horizontal pressure usually does not affect the wall.

What ever caused the original settlement still may exist to a much lesser extent, but the process can be repeated is absolutely necessary.

Dick
 
 

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