can conrete be be ground down?


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Old 07-20-06, 11:04 AM
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can conrete be be ground down?

My garage floor has settled a little bit over the years and has left a few high spots at the seems. Primarily one corner of one slab seems to have heaved up about 3/8", which is right in the middle of the floor and makes it difficult to roll the floor jack and the table saw around.

this is very hard concrete from the 1940s'. I'd like to get get those high spots knocked down, clean it and paint it in preparation to insulatiion and drywall to turn it into a much more functional work area. I've never heard of stain until a few minutes ago but I'll reasearch that.

I see grinding machines at the local tool rental but I'm not sure they will take away that much concrete, as opposed to just grinding rough concrete smooth.

I've called many contractors but they are only interested in jacking up the slab and pouring a new one. I can understand why they want to do that but I don't feel the need to go to that length for a floor that is in otherwise good shape.

thanks in advance.
 
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Old 07-20-06, 12:48 PM
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The rental "grinders" I'm familiar with are scarifyers that will leave you with an uneven surface full of little grooves. I also doubt that you will have lots of control over how much you take off. I believe there are sanding machines of some sort too, but I don't know about them.

In any case, if you want to stain the floor you need that existing top layer of "cream" or the stain won't work right. If you gring down the floor, it will be gone. There are epoxy materials that can be used for leveling and then later staining, but I'm not sure that's a DIY type of project.

See if anyone here disagrees with me...

Good luck!
 
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Old 07-20-06, 02:18 PM
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The high places in the middle of the slab are probably caused by settling around the perimeter, thus tilting the slab up in the center. I see it a lot, including in my own garage. The best fix would be slabjacking the edges of the slab up so they're level with the center again. You could grind down the high spots, but what a mess! The dust would be incredible, and the concrete wouldn't look right. You'd see all the aggregate where you ground it down, but nowhere else on the slab.

Pecos
 
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Old 07-20-06, 04:23 PM
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I don't know that there is much of a top layer of "cream" on this contrete. It's pretty coarse compared to the modern almost glass finish that I'm used to seeing in new construction. A sander might not be a bad idea.

I'll look closer to see if the lift is actually settling in the one corner.

If that's the case I should look in the phone book for people doing slabjacking? Now there's an interesting term. What do they pump in to lift the slab? Is this more cost effective than a jack hammer and a new slab?

thanks again.
 
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Old 07-21-06, 02:13 AM
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In slabjacking, they drill small (about 3/4 inch) holes in the slab and insert a hose which pumps lime slurry under the slab. It fills in the voids and the slab "floats" back up due to the hydraulic pressure. It is very effective, and cheaper than a tearout and re-pour. Look in the Yellow Pages under concrete contractors or slabjackers or mudjackers.

Pecos
 
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Old 07-21-06, 06:23 AM
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So far no luck finding a slabjacker. I'll keep looking.

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-21-06, 07:48 AM
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can conrete be be ground down?

Also look for mudjacking, slab raising, concrete raising, etc.

Dick
 
 

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