Possible brick damage (Hosing down brick)


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Old 07-24-06, 02:46 PM
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Possible brick damage (Hosing down brick)

Am I causing damage to exterior brick facade if I wet them to cool them off at the end of a hot day?
 
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Old 07-24-06, 03:10 PM
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If you are using hard water, or any type of mineralized, perhaps. You won't do thermal damage, if that is your concern. Most importantly, why would you want to do that?
 
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Old 07-25-06, 08:06 AM
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It's been as hot as texas here in central california lately. The brick holds so much heat late into the evening. Thought it would cool off the house a little if I cooled off the brick.
 
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Old 07-30-06, 03:14 AM
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Because of brick's thermal mass, it absorbs heat and slows down heat transfer. Brick is suppose to absorb heat from sun and keeps home cooler during the hottest part of the day. Because brick absorbs heat, in winter it keeps home warmer. The brick is doing its job when it absorbs heat.

Of greater concern would be adequate ventilation in attic to reduce interior heat and humidity and to save on energy. Make sure gaps around doors and windows are sealed and doors properly weatherstripped. Keep thermostat set at 78 degrees. Every degree below adds 7 or more per cent to electric bill. Keep drapes closed in summer to keep out the sun and its heat. Change AC filters frequently & make sure ducts are insulated.

In view of the recent heat wave and water shortages, these conservation measures will go further in keeping house cooler and save more on energy than hosing down brick, which would have minimal, if any, impact on reducing interior temperature. Hosing down brick will not only increase water bill, but can also create moisture issues around the foundation, especially if soil is not properly sloped to carry away excess water. Too, it can result in overwatering of foundation plantings.
 
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Old 08-19-06, 02:36 PM
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Tell me if I understand your root problem. The sun shines on the brick wall and the house heats up.

Assuming that's right:[1] I lived in a brick apartment, where I WANTED TO SPRAY IT with water. The end of the day meant the HVAC could not keep up. It costed alot in electric bills. The wall apparently had no insulation, since we now live in a house with a stone wall on the west. The west rooms have never been noticeably hotter. [Lived here 14 years.]

[2] You may not be able to insulate, but can you cover the wall so it gets no direct sunlight? This is a principle like black cars always get hotter than white ones. Is it a south wall? If a 2 foot by 20 foot strip, will get 6 hours of sun; then it gets fairly hot, and that radiates inside. [Turn on the water!]
In our current house the large trees shade it in the summer. You could have strings [like clothes line] running verically to the roof, or the soffits. Then get vines to twist their way to the tops of the Spring. This make a shade to substitute for no trees.
 
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Old 08-19-06, 03:19 PM
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Possible brick damage (Hosing down brick)

It is a waste of time, money and energy to try to cool an insulated masonry veneer wall by evaporation.

The heat removed by the evapoartion process is minimal.

Dick
 
 

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