Removing Concrete Walkway


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Old 08-06-06, 06:47 PM
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Removing Concrete Walkway

How difficult is it to demolish and remove a concrete walkway that is 100 square feet? The walkway was removed last year, repoured, and stamped with a pattern to look like tile, but the stamping didn't turn out well. Now we would like to remove it and repour a foundation for a tile base.

Can do it yourselfers tackle this job or should we search the yellow pages?
Note:The new walkway is reinforced with rebar and is adjacent to the foundation.
Please advise
Thanks,
Brian
 
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Old 08-07-06, 02:43 AM
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The rebar will cause you some grief, but it is easily do-able by a DIY. Just rent an air compressor with a 60 or 90 pound jackhammer and have at it. Getting rid of the broken concrete will be the big problem. If you don't have a good way to haul the compressor or dispose of the broken concrete, call a pro and let them do the whole tearout and removal. Hopefully, someone placed expansion joint material between the stamped walk and the foundation to protect against undue stresses and tension. It would make removal a lot easier.
I am curious about the stamped walkway. Was it professionally done or was it a DIY project as well? The reason I ask is because I am a professional concrete stamper and see poor jobs by DIYs all the time. There is an ongoing thread on another forum I frequent about this very topic. Just curious.
As to laying a slab for real tile; if you are in a freeze/thaw climate don't waste your time! Water will penetrate the grout, freeze, and pop up the tiles in very little time. I see it all the time on exterior work that was done with supposedly "frostproof" tile and grout. It might work in warm climates, but nowhere else. Good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 08-07-06, 06:19 AM
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The rebar is drilled into the existing foundation and I don't remember seeing them put any kind of expansion joint material. If we bust it up, do we cut through the rebar and leave part of it in the existing foundation, or do will pull it out? I don't want to put stress on the house.
The stamping was "professionally" done, but looks terrible. For one, he ran out of concrete and had to run to HD to get a couple of bags....that part didn't stain the same as the rest. Next, the plastic they placed on top before rolling was all crumpled, so the surface was, too. Now the raised 'crumples' are breaking off exposing the gray underneath. Hindsight is 20/20 and we have been kicking ourselves for a year, but time to move forward and say lesson learned. Do you know about putting tile directly on this stained and sealed surface? We live in Houston so freeze/thaw shouldn't be an issue.
Thanks for your advice
 
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Old 08-07-06, 01:34 PM
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Okay, I get it. For the record, that sidewalk wasn't stamped with modern stamping tools. It was either stamped using the old fashioned "cookie cutter" type platform tools, or rolled with a patterned roller. Both of these methods use plastic sheeting, whereas modern day stamping uses textured rubber mats. I will agree that the kind of textured concrete using plastic sheeting is butt ugly.
That said, as long as the concrete is sound, there is no need to completely remove it. Depending upon how even the surface is, you may only have to remove the sealer to apply the tile. A great sealer stripper is Hydrostrip, available at ICI/Dulux paint stores. The equivalent, that you could find online, is Remove-All (sp? possibly Removall?), by Napier Environmental Labs
If the surface is very uneven however, then you could rent a scarifier from a local rental yard and plane the surface down to an acceptable profile for tile.
Expansion joint material would be showing if they used it. It is a compressible material placed along the wall at the same height as the top of the concrete. It acts as a "shock absorber" to prevent damage to the wall or slab if the concrete moves, heaves, or settles. If you decide to break out the concrete, the rebar dowelled into the foundation probably won't hurt anything. Just break the concrete out from around it and use it in the next slab or cut it off flush with the wall.
Good luck.

Pecos
 
 

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