Attach board to concrete


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Old 08-13-06, 08:43 AM
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Attach board to concrete

Put a "header" board, (at least I think that's what it's refered to) above my back door and into the brick as a foundation for a small overhead porch roof I'm building. Got it attached, but noticed the ends have a 1/2"-1" warp outward. I used shields/lags about 2 feet inward on both ends of a 2x8. (Should have went closer to the ends). It's too late to drill the concrete and put shields/lags in as the porch is 80% done. Is there a fastener or something I can use that will go through a 2x8 and into the brick both? Thanks
 
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Old 08-13-06, 09:14 AM
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Attach board to concrete

Unless it is a real masonry wall and not just veneer, attaching a "header" to support a roof is just poor construction (forget about the obvious code violations).

A couple of screws 2 feet fom the end of a board is not much.

I assume you flashed to make sure the water leaking in does not rot the "header" and the rest of the wood.

Might be best to unscrew the bolts and start over.

Dick
 
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Old 08-13-06, 05:28 PM
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Well actually I went under the roof part of my house, so I wouldn't have to do any extra work. Gutters/roof weren't involved at all.
The 2 screws I was talking about are the ones just at the end of the boards. There are probably 7 or 8 throughout the header.
Is it really against codes to go into a brick foundation to put in a porch roof?
 
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Old 08-13-06, 07:10 PM
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Attach board to concrete

By code, you cannot support loads from brick veneer. You can only carry loads with structural members and brick veneer is not a structural member.

You mentioned a "brick foundation". Is this what you attached to or did you attach to the brick veneer?

The brick veneer may be very strong for a vertical load and may even be stronger than the wood frame behind it, but it was not designed and built to carry any roof loads.

I have no idea how big your porch roof is, but 7 or 8 shields of most sizes are really not rated to carry much load.

The flashing requirements would depend on the configuration and location.

Dick
 
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Old 08-14-06, 03:02 PM
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Porch is 11' wide, by 6' long.
Well, if veneer is brick plus morter in between then yes, that is what I did. Look below for a picture & give me your thoughts. Thanks
Would adding 4x4's at the corners of the header board (vertically), allow me to pass inspection?

http://x5.freeshare.us/view/?118fs370431.jpg
 
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Old 08-15-06, 09:47 AM
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Looking at the picture, it's not clear if this is brick veneer or a full brick wall. What is the thickness of the wall? Is there brick inside the house?

Essentially, brick veneer is where the building is built of wood frame such as 2x4 studs and some sort of sheathing and waterproof membrane with the brick just as a facing material. Structural brick walls are thicker, consisting of at least 2 thicknesses of masonry with a mortar or concrete infill and reinforcing steel between. This would result in a wall about 12" thick minimum.

Structural masonry walls for home construction are not common in areas prone to earthquakes, but are in areas where high winds are a problem.

If the wall is really a structural masonry wall then it can support the roof you have, but exactly what the connections should be should be verified with an engineer - or possibly your building department.
 
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Old 08-15-06, 01:11 PM
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Attach board to concrete

A couple of 4x4 posts with support (unsightly) with good bearing could fly -

What will pass an inspection is up to what the inspector sees (he may see nothing wrong without posts). If you don't agree, you can always quote parts of the code to justify your point. You do not have a lot of roof load unless someome wants to use it for access to shovel snow off your roof. If you have a big wind, that is a different problem.

Judging from what I see in the photo - brick style, size and color/texture and the apparent wall thickness, you probably have brick veneer. It could be over wood (4" or 6") or block (6" or 8"). It is even possible you have brick over a 6" block or brick wall.

Joe may have over-estimated the likely bearing wall thickness and reinforcement. You could have 6" postensioned (Arizona) or 8" (Florida). In South America, they build over 20 stories with our codes and 6" block with no concrete or steel columns, so guessing can be misleading. Since we are in a learning country, the odds are you probably have wood and brick veneer.

You say 2 of the 7 or 8 screws (size unknown) have apparently moved/pulled out (1/2" to 1") after the wood began to dry & twist. If that is the case, you still have a few solid screws left. I didn't see any washers. I don't know if you are required to have it inspected or if you plan on changing things.

If you do modify it, you could try to hit a stud with some 1/4" - 3/8" lag bolts. If you were going from scratch, you would try to find a stud at the height of a mortar bed joint. Since you house seems very regular and predictable(?) and you know you have studs off the door rough opening and probably near the electric box for the light (taking off the cover may tell you which side). Once you have a stud located the others should be somewhat predictable. The wood porch "header" would cover the exploration holes in the horizontal mortar bed joint.

The problem you have with this situation is not the strength of the brick veneer, but the fact it is held to the bearing wall with corrulated metal ties to provide stability. Fortunately, you have a door with a "header" course of brick and a steel lintel to stiffen the veneer. There are techniques to connect the veneer to the bearing wall without losing the benefits of the wall ties, but they get too complicated for a small project.

It is not the end of the world because of the size, but it does not meet code and a future purchaser may question it (especially when the wood dries and ages more).
Let us know of the outcome.

Dick
 
 

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