Extend a 2' high brick wall


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Old 09-13-06, 01:25 PM
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Extend a 2' high brick wall

I have an area where I want to extend the existing 2' retaining wall for an additional 30'. The 16" trench has already been cleared for the footings. What is a rough estimated of cost to hire someone to do the work. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
 
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Old 09-13-06, 01:45 PM
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Extend a 2' high brick wall

Because the excavation is done and you know the material cost, you are just looking for a labor contractor to match existing. A masonry contractor would not bother with such a small (60 sf wall, 30' footings) job.

Labor rates are based on where you are.

Start with getting local bids since internet prices don't give anything reliable for labor. You pay in local $s.

Dick
 
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Old 09-13-06, 04:22 PM
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I'm not a masonry expert by any means but I'm trying to figure out why you would need footings for a 2' tall retaining wall?? Aren't footings used solely for weight bearing walls or weight bearing structures? It doesn't seem that a 2' wall would weigh all that much. Now a 30' tall wall, yeah, that's heavy.
 
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Old 09-13-06, 04:31 PM
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The footings & rebar are being done as there will be 2" of backfill on one side of the wall once completed. Just to ensure the pressure over time from the backfill does not cause the wall to lean.
 
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Old 09-13-06, 04:47 PM
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Ah, yes, that would probably be smart then. I forgot about the "retaining" part of retaining wall (ha). Better to be safe than sorry. Good luck w/ your project.

Steve
 
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Old 09-13-06, 05:23 PM
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Extend a 2' high brick wall

fsufan8 -

The footing width is very important for all walls, including those in San Diego that often do no retain anything but air (privacy walls).

During an earthquake, many walls can tip over and become sidewalks if the the footing is not wide enough and there is not a good enough connection between the wall and the footing.

During the last couple of seismic events in California, many walls not built properly went over even though they looked good when built. That is the reason for codes and standards. Fortunately, a 4' or 6' wall does not fall on people, but just lays over slowly.

Fortunately, the mass of the wall is a great benefit in the minor "shakes and quakes" and there have been very few seismic problems with retaining and free-standing walls because of the understanding of seismology by the local California engineers and code officials. When it comes to mudslides, that is someting no one can resist and predict.

The proper width of a footing has little effect on the total cost, but is very important.

Dick
 
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Old 09-13-06, 05:40 PM
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As an aside, ConcreteMasonry, which do you recommend for footings in the following instances?

For mortared/poured retaining walls under 4' I recommend that the toe of the footing be under the dirt equal to 1/3 of the height.

For freestanding walls to 6', I recommend centering the footing, with the width equal to 1/4 of the height, or the depth equal to 1/3 of the height.

No frost to worry about, expansive clay soil as a rule.

These are recommendations to homeowners doing very small projects, not worth paying an engineer.
 
 

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