Any way to protect lawn from concrete truck?

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Old 10-19-06, 09:19 AM
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Any way to protect lawn from concrete truck?

Getting ready to pour foundation/patio for addition. Short of using a pumper truck, does anyone have any suggestions for keeping the damage to the lawn from the concrete truck to a minimum?
 
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Old 10-19-06, 11:38 AM
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Protect your lawn by laying down planks for the truck to pass over.
 
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Old 10-19-06, 01:37 PM
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A concrete truck would either crack and splinter the planks or smash them into the ground, depending on how soft the ground is. Also, if the truck had to make any turns, you'd have to keep moving the planks accordingly. FYI, the front discharge concrete trucks we have around here weigh about 17 tons empty, plus about another 2 tons per yard of concrete.
How much yardage are you talking about? When I have a backyard patio to pour where we can't get a truck, we wheelbarrow anything 5 yards and under. 2 guys can wheel 5 yards in about 1 hour (with contractor grade wheelbarrows). You might also consider a rented power buggy, but if the ground is soft you'd have to run it on 3/4 plywood.
If the truck does have to pull into the yard and ruts it up, just remember that it is sometimes easier to grow grass than to not make a mess. Good luck!

Pecos
 
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Old 10-19-06, 01:38 PM
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Any way to protect lawn from concrete truck?

A few planks will do little to help considering the size of the newer ready mix trucks. Even with planks you will have scarring/compaction requiring some filling. Pumping or a conveyor is the only way to guarantee to damage from the delivery.

Considering you are also going to be having lumber delivered and stored, the yard traffic during constuction and fact you will need some backfilling and landscaping, you might be better off just trying to minimize the damage you will have to repair.

Dick
 
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Old 10-19-06, 06:13 PM
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There are ways, and I have seen them used in extreme situations, but in every case they were more expensive (by far) than the cost of using a pump truck, had it been possible to do so.
 
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Old 10-20-06, 02:54 AM
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With a pump truck, consider this: What are you going to do with the extra concrete left in the hose and hopper after the patio is poured? Typically, there is 1/2 yard to a yard of concrete left in the hose/hopper. They can't put this back into the concrete truck and haul it back, so they empty it out on site. It is typically dumped in a big pile under the hopper of the pump, and is your (the contractor's) responsibility to dispose of it. That's a lot of extra concrete out in the street to get rid of. Not to mention that they have to wash out their pump truck (and ready mix concrete truck) on site before leaving. Where is the slurry going to go? Certainly not in the street or down the sewers, unless you want a visit and huge fine from the local EPA!
For this reason, we only use a pump truck on new construction where the piles of concrete are not a big concern. For existing homes with yards, they are much more of a pain in the butt than they are worth. I stick by the wheelbarrow!

Pecos
 
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