Need brick wall identification


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Old 11-28-06, 04:33 AM
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Exclamation Need brick wall identification

Hello people

I'm looking for a certain brick wall type for an interior but I can't find any name or identification for this particular style of brick with large mortar grooves

If someone knows the commonly used name for this, it will be appreciated

here is an image exemple :

http://3dvisuals.free.fr/hfr/brickwall.jpg

(please, copy and paste this line in your browser adress area then press enter)

Thx
 
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Old 11-28-06, 06:52 AM
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Need brick wall identification

What is pictured is not a special brick, but a method of laying the brick. Any style of brick can be used.

The brick are just laid in a thick mortar bed joint. An excess of mortar is allowed to ooze out. Instead of cutting off the excess and compacting the joint, the projecting mortar is shaped as desired. It is really what is termed a wide "beaded" joint. No mortar is used for the vertical joints. Common wall ties, laid in the mortar, are used to attach the brick veneer to the wall.

Occasionally, half length pieces of brick are laid in the wall for a random pattern appearance.

Because of the mortar joints, this type of construction should not be used for an exterior application unless there are elaborate measures taken for moisture control.

A good bricklayer will be able to replicate the appearance, given a good photograph. the construction is time-consuming, but certainly gives a unique appearance.

Dick
 
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Old 11-28-06, 07:17 AM
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>Dick: thank you very much for your explanation !
 
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Old 11-29-06, 06:34 PM
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I am going to have to disagree with you on this one ConcreteMasonry. That is not a beaded joint. It is also not an advisable method of laying brick. That is a raked joint that is the thickness of the brick, with the rake depth almost half or a little more of the brick width. So long as it is not in any way structural, it should not present a problem, though. The only reason I would build something like that is as a decorative applique on an an existing interior wall.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 07:52 PM
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Mortar joinr type

Tschraborough -

I can't argue, but definitely a "novelty" joint for a unique appearance.

I blew up the photo and also looked at it upside down also in case it had been flipped. I have seen this mistake in numerous closeup brick photos shot outside that just did not look right until you flipped them and got the shadows right.

If it is beaded, there there are the usual shadows on the lower half of the joint. - The lighter color on the top threw me. The one thing I questioned about the raked appearance is the lack of any mortar stains on the "bottom" of some of the brick - it is difficult to be that clean. Also, some of the joints had some wet vertical cracks that looked like unconsolidated mortar that was pulled.

Maybe at thinner brick set in thinset and mortared later instead of brick laid conventionally?

It is good it is for an interior application and not loadbearing.

Dick
 
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Old 11-29-06, 08:03 PM
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If you wait until the mortar is crumbly, then rake and wire brush, you won't get any mortar staining. The brick does not appear to be supported by the mortar in any substantial way, as evidenced by the mortar shrinkage/slump cracks, as well as the fact that there are no head joints.
 
 

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