Dry Stack Wall Question


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Old 12-08-06, 09:38 PM
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Dry Stack Wall Question

I am building a dry-stack wall and am ready to fill the cells that have vertical rebar in them. Some references say use concrete, others say use grout, but none say use mortar.

I have extra bags of mortar, why should you not use mortar to fill the cells?

Another question - mortar is the only one of the three that has any lime in it. What is the purpose of the lime in mortar.

thanks
 
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Old 12-08-06, 09:45 PM
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Need more info. Your local code will dictate the specific requirements at any rate.

Lime is added to cementious mortar to increase workability, flexurable and bond strength, as well as to promote autogenous healing and waterproofing.
 
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Old 12-08-06, 10:05 PM
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my project is out in "the county" so no local or state codes apply. I don't have to have a building permit, nor are there any inspections to complete.

Thanks for stating the purpose of lime in mortar. Now, why do all my references say use concrete or grout, but NOT mortar?
 
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Old 12-09-06, 08:44 AM
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Dry Stack Wall Question

Being "out in the country" is not an excuse for not doing it right.

Any code is a minimum and many people like to do it right in case the code is not good enough or right for them and their conditions.

You are filling the cores of the block for structural purposes, so you should use grout (a mixture of cement and fine aggregate - sand or gravel in proper proportions). Mortar is used for laying block or brick where strength is not critical.

If you are just dry stacking block and filling some cores, you are on very thin ice structurally. I have seen this attempted for many years. You could end up with junk because of the reduced vertical load capacity of the wall and the usual problems of grouting properly.

If you are using a recognized dry stack system with a surface bonding material permitted by codes, then just follow the surface bonding material instructions.

Good luck, but you may need more unless your situation is unique.

Dick
 

Last edited by Concretemasonry; 12-09-06 at 08:59 AM. Reason: Correcting for mis-read original post.
 

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