How is a lally column footing made?


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Old 12-20-06, 05:05 PM
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Question How is a lally column footing made?

We have a sagging beam crossing a load bearing wall that might ultimately need a lally column added to carry the load. I would like to know how the masonry aspect is handled.

I know we would have to cut open the floor and dig to sufficient depth for the footing. The questions are:

We're clearly below the frost line, so is the footing depth standard, based on load, or based on code? And, what size dia. or square does the footing need to be?

Does the new lally column sit on the footing or is it embedded into the footing?

There's a cast iron waste line that cuts about 4" from where the column would go. How do you work around that to get a proper footing size?

Thanks guys!
 
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Old 12-20-06, 11:07 PM
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Hi Syakoban

I'll assume were talking about a concrete floor. The footing should be 18" square and 1 ft. thick with re-bar in it. #5 in a box pattern. Dig down below the pipe for the footing. I would then use adjustable jacks on both side of footing, raise sagging beam slowly over several weeks. When at proper height cut and install Lolly on already poured footing. Then patch hole in floor.
Frank
 
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Old 12-21-06, 06:58 AM
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Can you explain why several weeks is needed?
 
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Old 12-21-06, 07:09 AM
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Raising sagging beams to desired height all at once can result in cracked plaster and other problems. The adjustment is made gradually so that everything else can gradually adjust, too. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
 
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Old 12-21-06, 07:41 AM
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Arrow

The wall above and subfloor are all getting replaced so they're not an issue with the effects of jacking. Are there any issues w/the new footing or existing slab if not jacked over weeks?

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-21-06, 02:44 PM
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Twelepole is correct.
The footing will be fine after 2 days, if there is no wall or floor above the wall you are replacing, then you can raise it faster. I would still go slow so the main beam has time to adjust.
Frank
 
 

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