Concrete sinks


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Old 12-22-06, 05:44 AM
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Arrow Concrete sinks

Does anyone out here have any experience with making the molds for concrete sinks? I am going to attempt one and need some advise. On the one I am making it is a bath sink about 28-30 in long and it is going to have a slit right in the middle for the drain. and the bowlis going to have a designe I guess you would say it looks like a bumpy slide if that makes since.
 
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Old 12-22-06, 05:00 PM
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You can not make a mold of an idea. It will take an object--a sink like the one you desire--to use to make the mold. Then, from the mold you can cast the sink.
 
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Old 12-22-06, 05:41 PM
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So, in other words, you would make a pattern first which is an exact copy of what you want the sink to look like.

Then you make the mold from the pattern and then , of course, the sink from the mold.
 
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Old 12-22-06, 09:11 PM
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Arrow Disagree

If anyone has seen on one of the DIY network show they made a counter top and what they did first was make a frame of mylon I think that is what it is called. I guess what I am trying to say they made a so called frame and then poured the concrete in it. If anyone has or has seen the Sunset Book of Decorative Concrete book page 79 upper right corner is the one I am asking about. You make a frame and pour concrete in and when you take it out it is finished sink. Is there a way to post a pic on this site
 
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Old 12-22-06, 09:32 PM
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Concrete sinks

Pouring a sink is not even close to something as simple as pouring a countertop.

1. You must have a considerable amount of reinforcement in a sink because of the shape, corners and type of loads on it.

2. You must have a internal mold that can collapse for removal or a tapered, stripable mold consisting of an internal and an exteral forming surface.

Because you will try to minimize the wall thickness, you will need specialized concrete and methods of curing. Even with the thinner walls, you will have a very heavy sink to move, install and support.

Dick
 
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Old 12-22-06, 09:53 PM
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Manufacturers of concrete counters and sinks have their own specialty mixes and use steel and glass fibers for reinforcement. They have special additives and curing techniques. The products are made in environments where temperature and humidity, which can affect curing, are controlled. Some DIYers have taken on concrete counters. Durability, as indicated, depends upon the mixture and the curing. Opening is left for undermount or drop-in sink. Concrete sinks are simply not as simple for a DIYer as undertaking a concrete counter.
 
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Old 12-23-06, 09:33 AM
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concrete sinks

Making a mold for a concrete sink is a bit of work but if you have the tools it can be done with the proper planing.If you keep it simple it will be alot easier,it can be constructed with melamie but you have to make sure all the edges are sealed so no moisture get in.You can use a pvc pipe for your drain knock out and the mold should be set in the countertop form.For more info check out www.miragestudiosltd.com they have a forum for concrete counters.good luck b
 
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Old 12-23-06, 09:42 AM
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Concrete sinks

Making a mold is one thing.

Being able to strip the mold from a sink shapes is another.

Making the sink out of the right materials is the final and critical step. The concrete used for a counter top will not fly. You will also need something to give the sink concrete some tensile strength.

Dick
 
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Old 12-24-06, 06:30 PM
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If I were going to make a concrete sink (and I would not be afraid to try), it would not be a part of the countertops, and would be a pretty massive piece, at least 3 inches thick, with no square corners.
 
 

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