man made stackstone fireplace install???


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Old 01-14-07, 08:24 AM
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man made stackstone fireplace install???

I bought a bujnch of man made stone to put behind my woodburner on the wall.
I applied Durock to the wall then metal lath and then the scratchcoat.
My question is installing the rock.

Top to bottom or bottom to top?

I will have a drop ceiling above also so am not too concerned with starting the th e[erfect spot up top. But, I want to put stone under the stove too but dont have it yet. So this would make me think to start at the top?

Any suggestions?

thanks
Bryan
 
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Old 01-14-07, 08:33 PM
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Drystack is usually easier to do from the bottom up, since it is generally thicker than other types,. Just figure out which stone you will be using for the floor, determine the thickness and shim the wall stone to the appropriate height.
 
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Old 01-14-07, 10:13 PM
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Also, "drystack" normally means a groutless install. Make sure the wall is a color you can tolerate seeing through the rock.
 
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Old 01-14-07, 10:43 PM
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The scratch coat is a dark grey in color to light grey.
 
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Old 01-15-07, 01:39 PM
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hocbry ...why didn't you just use hardibacker instead of going to the trouble of dry wall, then lath and scratch coat? Stone veneer can easily be adhered to just hardibacker (cement board) with thinset without the need for the lath and scratch coat. Just a future FYI ...

And I agree with the other response of working from the bottom up. The lower stones can actually act as support as you work your way up the wall. The very top stones may need to be cut to fit but that's no problem using a wet saw.

fsufan8
 
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Old 01-15-07, 10:50 PM
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I had a concrete block wall behind the stove. I built a frame using 2x4s and then faced it with Cement board Durock brand. And I spaced it out from the 2x4s with strips of the durock. I then was told to use a lath and scratchcoat to make the wall even stronger. I did this because I only had to pay 15 for the matal lath and about 3 bucks for the mortar so not really a big deal would you agree?

And I was told to work top down incase of some falling and knocking like a domino effect. But I agree. I will do bottom up.

Thanks for the replies so far guys.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 10:03 AM
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I think I mistook your Durock for Dry Wall. Sorry about that.

It's not the cost but the time and effort you could have saved. Actually, the best option would have been to just mortar the stone directly to the block wall. That's the best method because the block wall won't flex at all and thin set easily adheres to clean, pourous cement or brick. But no harm done.

And I think you were told wrong about top down. If the stones start falling downwards, your thin set is too wet. If this happens, don't continue to use it. Mix in more thin set powder and make the mixture on the drier side. Best way to check is when the thin set is mixed well, place a stick or long, thin piece of wood in it (standing up) and see if it falls to either side of the bucket. If it does, it's still too wet. If it stays in place, then it's probably good to use.

Another thing about working top down ...if your thin set is mixed right but the piece of stone you pick up to butter is larger/heavier than some of the others, you might have to prop it in place with some kind of joist while it hardens. I used pieces of 2x4 to support them one time and it was a pain in the butt. If you work from the bottom up, the stones below this would act as support since they have somewhat dried in place by the time you move upwards. But my experience is using dry stack stone veneer. The river rock and some others I am not sure on but would assume the same, bottom up. I don't think you ever mentioned what type you have purchased, did you?
 
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Old 01-16-07, 10:21 AM
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Everything but drystack is top down, both to keep it clean, and because they are thin enough to self-adhere. You should have applied the rock directly to the block with thinset, UNLESS it was painted. As a rule mix your mortar/thinset drier than normal for better "suck" to the wall.
 
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Old 01-17-07, 09:56 AM
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I am using the manmade stackstone style.
I couldnt put it directly behind the the stove right on the wall for 2 reasons
1. The wall was painted with drylock
2. The area behine had a column of cinderblocks, kinda like a support for the joists, so it jutted out here a bit. Which is why Ik built the wall out and faced like I did. I will post some pics later on.

Thanks guys.

Bryan
 
 

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