how do I pour a concrete pad???


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Old 01-16-07, 05:52 AM
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how do I pour a concrete pad???

i need help with pouring a concrete patio. it will be 25' x 20, and 4" deep. Could someone give me detailed instructions on how to set up the forms, and all materials I will need to buy? I just dont see the sense in paying someone a 1000 bucks to do this, if I can do it myself. Any advice and suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks
 
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Old 01-16-07, 06:40 AM
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There is far too much involved to be able to give you a step by step here. However, I must ask: Did you actually get a quote for $1,000 for a 500 sq ft pad? If so, that is an incredible price. Too incredible to be trusted, in fact. The materials alone would cost very close to $1,000. A breakdown of a typical job of this size is included below:

1) Excavation of the site: Grass, soil, and any organic material need to be removed. This may include digging it out to a depth of around 8 inches, hauling away the dirt, and filling it back in about 4 inches with compacted stone or sand. Materials needed: Shovel, wheelbarrow, and strong back (cheap) or rented excavating machine and dump truck/trailer (not so cheap), stone or sand, plate compactor.
2) Formwork: For a 4 inch thick slab, you could use 2x4s for forms. If you want any curves, you'd have to use something else that would bend. You must stake the forms to hold them in place and up to grade. Place a wooden or steel stake about every 4 feet. Materials needed: saw, 2x4s, stakes, nails, dry string line, 4 foot level or laser level, hammer, small sledgehammer for stakes.
3) Concrete: about 7 cubic yards of concrete (air-entrained if you are in a freeze/thaw climate). Note, you will NOT be able to buy sacks of concrete mix and mix/pour it all before it sets up. You will need to call a ready-mix concrete plant and have them deliver it in a truck. The truck is very heavy and will cause damage to your yard or driveway when it pulls in. If you don't want it to pull onto your property, you must haul the concrete from the truck to the patio another way (wheelbarrow, $$pump truck$$, or motorized concrete buggy.) You must unload the truck quickly to avoid the concrete setting up too fast, and to avoid extra charges for keeping the truck too long. You must also provide a place for the truck to wash out after pouring. This CANNOT be anywhere (like in the street) where the runoff will go down into the sewer.
4) Pouring and finishing tools: Rubber boots and gloves (you don't want to get cement burns or concrete poisoning), screed board, flat shovels or concrete rakes, hand float, bull float, edger, groover, finishing broom. These can be bought or rented, but you will ABSOLUTELY need them!
5) concrete sealer: To keep the slab protected

This is a very general list of what is required. If you don't have the know-how or experience, it is not a good DIY project because it is too large. Start with something a lot smaller and learn the basics before attempting this. However, if you feel you must, then get a how-to book from the home center or library for the steps involved. good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 01-16-07, 07:23 AM
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What Pecos said, and I will add that concrete pavers are an excellent alternative for DIY'ers to create patios with. They are not cheaper, but they are much more forgiving to work with and look a lot better even when done by rookies.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 10:16 AM
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Is this patio to be converted to a garage later?
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=290910

You can pour a slab w/foundation for your garage and use it as a patio until ready to build the garage. A patio slab is not sufficent to build on later.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:08 AM
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concrete work

no. this patio isnt going to be converted into a garage. the concrete slab Im needing is going in the backyard, off of my laundry room. I will be using this as a base for my screened in porch. So I dont think pavers would work. I need it to be able to bear the weight of the roof. Im trying to find out how to set it all up, so I can pour the concrete.
Do I dig down so far, and make it all level?
Then add a layer of sand?
Im just not sure, any advice is appreciated, Kim
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:15 AM
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any advice is appreciated

----------------------------------------------------

my advice would be to pay a pro.

while it may seem simple there is a bit to it .

what if you make errors and it needs to be redone ?

you now have to add the cost of breaking up and removing the DIY project to the cost of having it done right
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-16-07 at 07:36 PM. Reason: Extraneous commentary removed
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Old 01-16-07, 11:27 AM
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concrete slab

Pecos,
the $1,000 estimate is for labor only. I buy all materials and have the truck come and pour. Thats too pricey for me.

MangoMan,
I am simply trying to break down the process, so I could do it myself.
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-16-07 at 07:34 PM. Reason: Off-topic comments deleted. Put-downs not allowed in forums.
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Old 01-16-07, 11:32 AM
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no , I'm saying that I know my limitations and can recognize that to build on a poor foundations will cause more problems than its worth

there are DIY projects and there are ones best left to a pro
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-16-07 at 07:38 PM. Reason: Off topic comments edited. Put-downs not allowed in forums.
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Old 01-16-07, 11:56 AM
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Pecos has given you about as good as advice as you are going to get on a BBS. Perhaps his best advise was to check out some basic construction books. I will tell you this, though: If you are planning on pouring a slab that will support columns and a roof, the services of a proffesional will pay for themselves. The type of stucture you are talking about is not a patio it is a foundation. Unless you are ouside of municipal jurisdiction, you will be required to have a set of engineered drawings and a permit.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 12:17 PM
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Wink

I come out cost here for what you want is $1032.25.
Check at your library ,they will have books on this for you. With the roof later on . It will pay to put grade beams in it. That would be like dig down all around the inside of the form say 12" deep and 16" wide. Lay rebar in it. Plus the 6X6 mesh over the whole thing. You have to check code for where you are for what they want.

 
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Old 01-16-07, 01:19 PM
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Where are you located? If this is going to be a room addition, and you are in a freeze/thaw climate, then you will need frost footings. In my area (Indiana) the footings need to be 32 inches deep by code, and cannot be done without a permit and inspection. Footings that deep and 1 foot wide will double the amount of concrete you need to somewhere between 12 and 14 cubic yards. You aren't going to dig these by hand, so you'll need a backhoe/excavator.
I assume that the labor you contacted was going to supply the excavator, finishing tools, etc., and you were just buying the materials (concrete, fill stone, and forms maybe) If so, the $1,000 for labor is a real bargain.
At any rate, the very first thing you need to do is to check with your local building inspector and ask him what the requirements are for a foundation and slab for a room addition. It makes no difference if you are just going to use it as a patio for now. You will never be able to build on it if it does not conform to building codes.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 01:36 PM
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If you do diy, make sure you have plenty of help! Concrete work ain't easy.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 01:58 PM
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Mommytwomany,
for some very basic instructions, check out the how-to info on this website (not in the forums). There are several articles on concrete, although I don't necessarily agree with all the information that's contained in them. There are articles about forming, foundations, etc. Good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 01-16-07, 07:42 PM
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Building codes vary from area to area and dictate residential construction specifications from the foundation up. Plans must be presented to the local building inspector for approval, permits, and inspections.
 
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Old 01-21-07, 12:22 AM
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The simple fact of this project is you are biting off more than you can chew.

It is not a small job and to have a good looking end product you will need a professionals skills. This is more of a monoslab than simple pad if it is indeed a load bearing slab. I would assume that you want the floor to enhance the overall look of your completed project. If it is a poor quality finish it will certainly detract from the look of you enclosed patio.
 
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Old 01-21-07, 02:24 PM
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Slab

I agree with posters above. In addition to their good advice, I offer the following:
1. A slab of this size needs to be sloped slightly for drainage.
2. If sloped, it needs to be low enough below your present floor to allow space for floor joists to level the floor if it is enclosed at a later date.
2. You will be hard pressed to find a 20 ft. long screed board. You will need a temporary screed support down the center, or do 2 pours of 10x25 each.

I would advise you to hire professionals.
 
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Old 01-22-07, 06:24 AM
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We are rabid DIYers and did an 8x8 pad for our hot tub. Never again. If anything it's extremely HEAVY work. Can you pick up 80lb of dead weight and hold it up to a mixer while pouring in the contents? Once 3-5 of those plus water is in your mixer can you tilt that 300 lb mixer (without it falling over) while you pour the contents into a specific spot? Do that over and over again for a day or two... I have no problem lifting 50 lbs and was practically incapable of doing a darn thing on the hot tub pad project... even screeding pushed me to my physical limits. A PITA is what DIY pad pouring is!

It's worth the moolah to hire a pro... you might be paying the labor costs again later in chiropractor and massage therapist visits! ;-)
 
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Old 01-25-07, 10:47 PM
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Concrete work is hard

If one possess good carpentry skills they can frame up the pour, but it is best to have skilled labor and finishers for the actual pour itself. It is hard work and good finishing is an art.
Here is a link to some framing illustrations and advice.
http://h1.ripway.com/ConcreteMan/
 
 

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