filling hole in yard with cement for sump pump pit

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Old 01-30-07, 06:39 PM
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filling hole in yard with cement for sump pump pit

I want to fill in a hole I dug in my yard (section of lawn) with cement to house my sump pump.

Here is my plan.

Square the hole large enough to fit the pump, tamp the bottom level. Build a square wooden frame, insert in the hole and pour concrete between the wooden frame and the dirt (hole wall). Fill in the bottom and level. Place a steel or hard plastic grate over the top.

Anyone see any flaws in this plan.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 05:35 AM
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Plastic Sump Pit Liner

Why not just use one of the commercially available plastic sump pit liners?

I'm curious how you are going to pump out the water through a pipe if you are putting a grate on top of your proposed concrete sump pit liner.

Final question is why are you putting a sump pump outside where it could be overtaxed during a heavy rain or freeze up if you live in a colder climate?

What are you trying to accomplish with this sump pump?
 
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Old 01-31-07, 07:13 AM
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Maybe sump pump isn't the correct term. Our yard doesn't drain well and becomes a swamp in rainy season. I have the pump in a hole now and it pumps the water out to the street through pvc pipe.

I'm going to cut 2 holes in the wooden frame (before pouring cement) and run 2 pvc pipes into the pit, 1 for the water ,one for the electrical connection.

I want to use cement just to avoid having to replace the liner. I'm in Northern California, so freezing is not an issue.

Thanks.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 07:27 AM
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This may be too elementary, but make sure you use concrete mix instead of cement. Cement is just one component of concrete, and has no strength in and of itself.
The other thing I would do is to remove the wood forms after the concrete sets up, but before filling the bottom with concrete. That way, there are no voids once the wood eventually rots away. Good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 01-31-07, 11:53 AM
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Another option

You might try going to a commercial company that makes concrete septic tanks and distribution boxes. They might have just what you need.

Another option is a company that makes precast storm drains. They might have a small concrete box you could use.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 09:47 PM
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Thanks for the tip on concrete, I'll check some suppliers first for the bins.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 02:22 PM
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Not to hijack this thread by any means but I have this same problem. When it rains, there is a low spot in my backyard where I had a flagstone patio and fire pit installed. It's slightly lower than the rest of the yard and actually, it's low because we removed approx. 10 yards of soil when I had my backyard relandscaped and we dug down at this very spot that now floods (so it is my fault that it's low). But when it rains like it has here for the last few days, standing water accumulates over the flagstone patio and sits there until the air heats up to evaporate it or it infiltrates into the ground. But because standing water sits on the flagstone, the stone becomes water damaged and I have to reseal it to bring the color back. I installed drains on both sides of the patio but the lines are not hooked up to the main drainage system in the yard since this is the low spot so the water will not travel upwards towards the main yard drain but rather back up over the drain. Even so, these drains are not designed to handle large amounts of water ...only light rains and irrigation run-off.

Should I install a sump pump with a line that takes the water to the street? If so, could I use a flexible hose to hook up to the pump when it's needed but when its dry like it is most of the time here, I could roll it up and put it in the garage or would I need a permanent PVC line that runs from the backyard to the front and out into the street? I guess I could tie a PVC line into the main drain system in the yard and have the pump pump water into that which already has a port in the concrete curb for the water to pass through. Does anyone know the most economical way to solve this problem?

Thanks,
Steve
 
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Old 02-01-07, 08:45 PM
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I've been doing as you said, during the rainy season I drop the pump into the hole with a flexible line to the street. Just got tired of doing it and want something permanent.

It works fine though.
 
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