new house bad concrete walkway!


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Old 02-07-07, 05:23 PM
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new house bad concrete walkway!

Bought an 11 year old house and the house faces north, hence no sun on walkway..we have a "pebble look" walkway..anyway with big freeze here in NM the past month, the ice finally melted and voila!...concrete/pebbles are coming up in sheets!...there are older "pits"/craters as well, and I want to fix it right....power wash off bad stuff to get to good and recover??.....rock carpet material??...tile it over??.....or just bust it out and redo!?!....money IS an issue here....about 100 sq ft of walkway....any ideas or help??....I can get apicture of it if that helps any of you..and thanks!!
 

Last edited by robby1824; 02-08-07 at 09:28 AM. Reason: have photos now, but cant attach for some reason!
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Old 02-07-07, 07:09 PM
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A photo or two would help immensely.
 
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Old 02-07-07, 08:27 PM
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tommorrow....

I will have something tomm evening..thanks
 
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Old 02-08-07, 01:13 AM
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That stuff is put on a plain concrete pad, which should be in fine condition. I think the masons neglected to tooth the pad, so, the topping hasn't anything to grab.

I think your best bet (with money as a factor) is to rent/borrow an impact drill and wide chisel attachment. Use the "hammer" setting without rotary, work nearly at horizontal to *shear* the topping off. Then decide if/how to resurface the pad.

You could also do this with hand tools (wide mason's chisel + hammer). That's the same action, just muscle not electricity. Much much slower.
 
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Old 02-08-07, 04:21 AM
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when you say "pebble look", do you mean it is coated with an epoxy rock mixture which is flaking off, or is it exposed aggregate concrete which is pitting? If epoxy rock, you'd about have to get an experienced pro to patch it. I've never seen these materials sold to homeowners before. Furthermore, a lot of folks use epoxy rock in the first place to cover bad concrete. If you can somehow get it all off without destroying your surface (which is doubtful since a lot of the epoxy resin will bond well) there may be bad concrete underneath.
If exposed aggregate, I guess it would all depend upon your abilities as a DIYer. If you don't have experience at exposed agg though, you could make it worse than it is now.
Maybe the first thing to do would be to get a couple of estimates to fix it. You don't have to hire them, and at least you'd know what they proposed to do and how much it would cost. Good luck.

Pecos
 
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Old 02-08-07, 02:10 PM
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walk way

Picture in this case, worth more then a thousand words, could be worth a thousand bucks.

No one can tell you what to do unless you provide more info. ie. picture.

First thing a person would need to know is, The concrete walk way, by the description I can tell its pretty ugly, but is it stable, stable to the point that another layer of concrete would not be to much? Is it slopping, and not holding water after a rain. What made the exposed aggregate decide to come up at this point and not earlier, ie, worse then usual winter.

If you where to pour over the existing side walk, would it mess up the elevation to the point that this would not be possible. Such as where the walk way is level with the door so you cannot pour on top.

If you are able and willing to tear the concrete up, I would almost have to beilieve that this would be the best route, but if money is an issue and you can't tear it up, and have to pay some one, it will be very costly, I am sure.

Post pictures the more the better.
 
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Old 02-08-07, 02:32 PM
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new house bad concrete walkway!

A picture is definitely needed.

One of the first things that comes to mind is salt and concrete that was not air entrained. It could have lasted 11 years with warmer weather and no salt, but Mother Nature was not too kind in some areas.

Dick
 
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Old 02-08-07, 05:17 PM
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how do I post the pictures!

it says I cannot attach....I took some, and they will show it all!.....
 
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Old 02-09-07, 03:07 AM
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Most people post them on photobucket or something similar, then provide the link in their posting. I really wish this site would just allow you to post photos directly, but it doesn't.
 
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Old 02-09-07, 07:03 AM
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Got The Pics Ready.....

here is s laink to the pics....thanks pecos for photobucket idea.....anyway this is what it looks like!!

http://s156.photobucket.com/albums/t27/robby1824/concrete/
 
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Old 02-09-07, 07:39 AM
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It's hard to see clearly in these photos because they are so bright, but I don't think you have epoxy rock (chattahoochee). It looks to me like an exposed aggregate walkway with pea gravel for aggregate.
I don't know that much about the climate in New Mexico, but I never thought it was in a freeze/thaw climate. If the ice was a fluke, then your normal exterior concrete may not be air-entrained, and so less resistant to scaling. Here's a question for you: Did you put any de-icing chemicals or salt on your ice to thaw it? It looks like it from these photos. De-icing salts will destroy concrete, especially so if it is not air-entrained.
You can try the rock carpet approach, but any overlay is only as good as the concrete it covers. I would expect problems in the future.
I think if you want it to look as it should, a complete tearout and re-do is in order here. If you do it, make certain your contractor uses air-entrained concrete this time.

Pecos
 
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Old 02-09-07, 09:14 AM
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walkway

You could try, a product they call around here called top-n-bond, it is a product when mixed with water allows you to cover existing work, at even the thinist of coverage but will still adhere, then you can cover with tile.

It does not look like you have a structural problem yet, it does look like heavy salting has taken its toll, I believe the flaking will continue but with the top-n-bond coverage and the tile over that I believe this will stop further damage from the elements such as water and freeze and thaw, tile is less likely to succumb to salt damage, or freezing and thawing, just a thought to consider.
 
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Old 02-09-07, 11:08 AM
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I think that I want to tile it over...yes we do get freezing in Albuq during th winters, and the previous owners used salt I think....I may try to take off a few inches of the concrete (not completely level anyway) and use the top n bond...found that online, can you get it in a store that you know of?? we have ACE, HD, Lowes, etc...I amy also try some specialty places as well.....I will be pulling out the pressure washer soon and seeign what that takes off, and chhisel the rest to get to a solid base....may get to the bottom, who Knows at this point!...thanks all
 
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Old 02-10-07, 05:31 AM
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Before you do that, find out if anyone around you has tile on their exterior concrete and ask them how it's held up. In freeze climates, you can get the same problems you're looking at now; delamination. I cannot tell you how many jobs I've done where people tiled their exterior concrete only to have the tile freeze and pop off. Every one of them told me "the guy used frost proof tile and grout so we thought it would be okay". Some of the tile was also extremely slippery when wet. Don't go blindly in this direction. Good luck.
 
 

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